Sundance 2015 Review: THE OVERNIGHT Goes There

It's so incredibly tempting to reveal all the bizarre places Patrick Brice's new film, The Overnight, takes its audiences, who, if they're anything like this viewer, will likely watch the film with mouths gleefully agape.The film opens in the bedroom... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: H. Explores The Strange Dissonance Of Coupling

There's something strange in the waters of Troy, New York. Something life-changing in the skies. Some of us can see it, some of us can hear it. Some of us will wander into the woods to find it, leaving our... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: HELLIONS, A Monstrous Misstep

Hellions, Journeyman director Bruce McDonald's first foray into horror since 2008's slow-cooker Pontypool, is a maelstorm of horror traditions and tropes, good and bad alike. While the film is never boring for its constant barrage of evocative imagery, cacophonous score... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: LAST DAYS IN THE DESERT And The Closeness Of The Great Divide

Director Rodrigo García's minimalist Christ-centered parable on fathers and sons pivots the holy man as everyman and observer. It's an approach that feels of merit: one that ultimately doesn't see earth-bound humanity and a more intangible sense of spirituality as... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: In STINKING HEAVEN Everything Rotten Is Good

We all live by rules. Whether they are personal choices to undertake or those put upon us by work or family, we live by them. But sometimes those rules can destroy us.Nathan Silver's fifth feature, Stinking Heaven, takes place in... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Slamdance 2015 Review: FEMALE PERVERT Cuts Cute With Gender Roles

Sex. We wouldn't be here without it. And we sure do like it. But who wants to talk about it? Especially all those particulars...Filmmaker Jiyoung Lee is ready to though, and her intelligent, equally charming and cheeky examination on female... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: In SONG ONE, The Tune May Be Familiar, But The Performance Is Lovely

One of the great pleasures of experiencing music, especially genres such as pop, or - more pertinently for this review - indie folk, lies in the familiarity of its forms. Like comfort food for the ears, they follow well-established stylistic... More »
  

Review: EX_MACHINA Starts Strong, But Falls Into Cliché

Alex Garland has become known for some pretty great sci-fi screenplays, such as 28 Days Later, Sunshine and Dredd. So it seems only natural that he would eventually direct one of his own works. Ex_Machina has some great elements, such as... More »
  

Review: APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOR Marks The Emergence Of A Major Comedic Talent

Imagine, if you will, that Woody Allen, Jerry Seinfeld, and Louis CK got together to create a love child who had Lena Dunham as a nanny, and who grew up to become a bisexual Iranian-American woman. Such a person, if... More »
  

Review: BLACKHAT, Michael Mann's Moronic Cyber Scavenger Hunt

Humanity's fascination with the microchip started long before they became everyday necessities for the first world population. You see, we humans have always taken strides for some semblance of consistency and structure through networks and grids. Design and architecture in the... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: LA ULTIMA PELICULA, Featuring A Melancholy, Amusing Apocalypse

The year 2012 was, for most of humanity, a waiting game. The Mayans predicted the world's end. Riots sprouted. Floods happened. Scandals erupted. It seemed the Mayans spoke true, but there was still no assurance that the world was on... More »
By Oggs Cruz   
  

Review: TAKEN 3, Action Cinema For Teenage Softies

Liam Neeson's third outing as over-protective family man Bryan Mills sees him on the run for murder after his ex-wife (Famke Janssen) turns up dead in his apartment. Forest Whitaker heads the investigation, which soon enough uncovers the involvement of... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: SEVENTH SON, Generic And Self-Serious Fantasy Fare

A bad spell seems to have been cast on Seventh Son. Sergei Bodrov's first American feature - to whom we owe the impressive 2007's Mongol - saw its release indefinitely delayed. Originally slated to hit US theaters on February 2013,... More »
  

Review: EXODUS: GODS AND KINGS Is Lost In The Wilderness

Meeting, but rarely exceeding, expectations, Ridley Scott's grand retelling of Moses and the Hebrews' flight from Egypt is strong on visuals and A-list presence, but slight on narrative and characterisation. Christian Bale and Joel Egerton both put in fine performances... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Cairo 2014 Review: JOY OF MAN'S DESIRING, The Poetry of Work

While many factory jobs have moved to countries like Mexico or China, Canada still has its fair share of manufacturing. Most of us probably don't think about where many of our goods come from, or the difficult and often... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: A CINEMA OF DISCONTENT Deftly Explores Censorship

I'm sure many cinephiles are familiar with the Motion Picture Production Code, used by Hollywood in the mid-20th century to govern 'morality' in films. A self-imposed censorship, it banned any sexual acts beyond kissing, excessive violence, profanity, and many other... More »
  

Review: THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY - PART 1 Slows Series To A Crawl

With two global smashes that have banked $1.5 billion between them, the Hunger Games series has captured the imagination of spectators around the world with a well-balanced combination of spectacle and emotional depth. Mockingjay - Part 1, the first part... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: OPEN WINDOWS Thrills And Chills

Early on in Open Windows, Spanish filmmaker Nacho Vigalondo invites easy comparisons to Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window, but then, pardon the expression, he throws them out the window. What begins as an homage quickly morphs into a thriller with its... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: DIE FIGHTING, An Energetic, Meta Martial Arts Flick

Die Fighting, the latest from martial arts maestros Z Team, also marks the full-length directorial debut of Wushu specialist and choreographer Fabien Garcia, after making the short films Duel, Fantasy Story, and Brothers Forever. It's a nice bit of undemanding... More »
  

Toronto After Dark 2014 Review: THE TOWN THAT DREADED SUNDOWN, A Solid Slasher Flick With Style To Spare

The Town That Dreaded Sundown begins with Texarkana resident Jami Lerner at the local drive-in with Corey. They are watching the original 1976 flick at an annual screening on Hallowe'en night. Jami is not having a good time so the... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  
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