SXSW 2014 Review: OPEN WINDOWS Never Shuts Down Its Thrill Ride

Early on in Open Windows, Spanish filmmaker Nacho Vigalondo invites easy comparisons to Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window, but then, pardon the expression, he throws them out the window. What begins as an homage quickly morphs into a thriller with its... More »
  

Review: Tone-deaf MONSTER Exhibits Unusual Cruelty Towards Women

Ingenue Kim Go-eun gets her first top billing in director Hwang In-ho's uneven and sadistic revenge thriller Monster. Exhibiting the same irreverence towards genre as in his previous film Spellbound (2011) but with none of the panache, Hwang fails to... More »
  

FICUNAM 2014 Review: THE SEARCHES (LAS BÚSQUEDAS), A Small Black And White Drama With Depth

José Luis Valle's The Searches (Las Búsquedas) reveals at the end that it was filmed in seven days using real locations, without artificial lights, and costing only $1,500 dollars in total. It is indeed a very small film, with a... More »
  

Yubari 2014 Review: GUN WOMAN Is Bloody, Trashy Entertainment

Capitalising on a spirited central performance from Japanese actress Asami as the eponymous heroine, Mitsutake Kurando's blood-soaked US-based crime thriller rises above its budgetary limitations in suitably sleazy style.Killing time on a long drive through the desert, a pair of... More »
  

Blu-ray Review: Capt. John Noel's THE EPIC OF EVEREST From The BFI

The ill-fated 1924 attempt to reach the peak of Mount Everest was an incredibly politically charged undertaking, with British authorities desperate to reaffirm the country's superiority as a world force after recent attempts to be the first nation to reach... More »
  

Review: THE UNI (Vejška) Awkwardly Balances Generational Manifesto And Capitalist Fairy-tale

In 2007, Czech director Tomáš Vorel sr. made a film called The Can, an adaption of the book Graffiti Rules. As the name of the source material suggests, the main motif was graffiti and hip hop subculture, something that... More »
  

SXSW 2014 Review: WETLANDS Paints An Excitingly Vulgar Picture

When a film begins with a teenage girl deliberately smearing her genitals all over an especially disgusting public toilet seat, you pretty much have an idea what you're in for. Wetlands, director David Wnendt's sophomore feature after the award winning Nazi... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

SXSW 2014 Review: HONEYMOON Is All Parts Scare

From Honeymoon's opening montage of our newlywed couple reminiscing about falling in love, you might think you are settling in for romantic drama about the challenges of starting a life together. You'd be wrong. While plenty of challenges await... More »
  

Review: THE WRATH OF VAJRA Is Pure Martial Arts Madness

Martial arts films are a dime a dozen in Southeast Asia, however, finding a really good one is pretty difficult these days. Either the film's action is overly dependent on goofy wire work, or the filmmakers let ridiculous things like... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: COMMUNITY S5EP08 "App Development And Condiments" Gets Dystopic

I've spent a good few minutes typing and retyping more informed, humorous and/or clever openings to this review, only to come back to this conclusion: Last night's Community was an episode that featured one of the show's always interesting experiments... More »
  

Review: JOURNEY TO THE WEST Dazzles, Frightens, And Still Tickles The Funny Bone

Frequently adapted for the big screen, the latest version of Journey to the West quickly became one of the highest grossing films in China's box office history. That's not surprising, really, given the recent penchant for black comedy in cinema,... More »
  

Review: IN FEAR Takes A White-Knuckle Ride On A Dark Night

New couple Tom and Lucy are on their way to a music festival, to meet up with friends, camp, and explore their new relationship, when things go terribly awry. In Fear opens with Lucy in the loo of a pub,... More »
  

Review: WAR OF THE WORLDS: GOLIATH, A Good Old Animated Steampunk Sci-fi Romp!

War of the Worlds: Goliath takes place 15 years after the first arrival of Martians. In the city of Leeds, England, a young Eric watches his parents get disintegrated by a Martian tripod. As H.G. Wells' story goes the Martians... More »
  

Review: HONEY, A Beautifully Nuanced Directorial Debut From Actress Valeria Golino

Irene (Jasmine Trinca) lives alone by the ocean and has a peculiar job -- assisting deaths in terminally ill patients and their families by observing and providing poison used in putting down sick pets. Assisted suicide is a taboo subject... More »
  

Review: Emotional Drama LOVING Searches For Truth About The Mechanics Of Love

In an impassioned and perceptive manner, Loving (Milosc) breaks down the essence of a marriage on the verge of collapse. The sharply-written script goes beyond the surface in order to expose all the ingredients crucial for the formation and further development of... More »
  

Review: AMBASSADA Has An Extremely Poor Sense Of Humor

Apparently, after all those magnificent years of creating hilarious, crowd-pleasing comedies Juliusz Machulski (Vabank, Sexmission, Kiler) has finally lost his comedic touch. His oeuvre is like an almost never-ending bag of laugh-inducing creations and a source of great joy, mostly... More »
  

Review: THE DARK VALLEY Is As American As Austria Can Get

In Andreas Prochaska's Austrian Neo-Western about an enigmatic horseman who comes to a remote Austrian village in a deserted valley everything looks like a big Hollywood production with stunning production design, costumes and make-up. The Dark Valley is then an... More »
  

Review: STALINGRAD Offers Massive Visual Spectacle But Little Else

Its US release coming on the heels of the just-wrapped Sochi Olympics, where Russia presented a noble image of itself for both domestic and international consumption, the Russian war film Stalingrad seeks to do much the same in cinematic terms. It... More »
  

Review: COMMUNITY S5EP07, "Bondage And Beta Male Sexuality" Brings The Substance

Before we get to the review proper... yes, to the two people who read these, I missed reviewing the last two episodes on account of some serious Sundance fatigue (In such a state I became selfish and also just wanted... More »
  

Review: THE LUNCHBOX, An Exquisite Ode To Love And Longing

Dabba (The Lunchbox) by Ritesh Batra is an exquisite, bittersweet ode to love and longing from India, that makes your heart sing. A debut feature that screened at the Cannes Film Festival, it won the Grand Rail d'Or Award in... More »
  
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