Berlinale 2016 Review: WE ARE NEVER ALONE Delivers A Powerful, Harrowing And Way Too Vivid Parable

Petr Václav, the Czech filmmaker living and working in France, returns to the theme of racial discrimination already addressed in his feature debut Marian (1996). Prejudice based on race persists as a hot topic in the Czech Republic, attracting ever... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Review: Zulawski's COSMOS Is A Wordy Madcap Comedy That Tries To Make Sense Of It All

Andrzej Zulawski lost his battle with cancer last week, adding his name to mounting number of cultural icons who passed away this year. His death came as a shock especially to New York cinephiles, who's been waiting patiently for the... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: KIKI Knows It's Sexy

Billed as a sort of follow-up to Jennie Livingston's Paris Is Burning, Sara Jordenö's debut feature takes us back to the heart of the New York's ballroom scene - only this time the director casts her lens over a very specific... More »
By Thomas Humphrey   
  

Review: MIRUTHAN, Kollywood's First Zombie Film Is A Perfect Indian Horror Concoction

In India, horror films have typically been the red-headed stepchild that no one really talks about. Yes, there are some great b-movies from the '70s and '80s, but the mainstream has largely ignored the genre as inconsistent with the studios'... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: NEERJA Is The Story Of A Heroic Woman Told With Grace And Humanity

On September 5th, 1986 during a stopover In Karachi, New York bound Pan Am Flight 73 was hijacked by Palestinian terrorists. This airliner, packed to the gills with 379 passengers and crew, was then held hostage for 17 hours by... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

END OF DAYS, INC. Dark Supernatural Comedy Opens In Toronto Tomorrow!

Jennifer Liao's dark comedy with a supernatural twist End of Days, Inc. opens here in Toronto, Friday, February 19th, at the Carlton Cinema. Liao, producer Sandy Kellerman, and the cast (Carolyne Maraghi, Janet Porter, Anna Ferguson, Yulia Petrauskas, and Paulino... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Review: A WAR, A Classic No-Win Scenario

Battles are never won; at best, they are only survived. In each of his first three films, writer/director Tobias Lindholm has tackled familiar subjects; each film has also featured Pilou Asbaek in the lead role. Lindholm collaborated with Michael Noer... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: YOU'LL NEVER BE ALONE, A Smart Chilean Debut

There perhaps hasn't been that many films to blow your socks off at Berlinale so far this year, but Alex Anwandter's You'll Never Be Alone could well be the first. Definitely proving to be yet another example of how great contemporary South... More »
By Thomas Humphrey   
  

Review: ANGEL OF NANJING, A Portrait Of Urban Loneliness

Like Japan's Aokigahara (aka "Forest of Death,") and San Francisco's Golden Gate, Nanjing's Yangtze River Bridge is famous for being the site of a disproportionate number of suicides each year. Chen Si is a man who has taken it upon... More »
By Teresa Nieman   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: First, SOY NERO Dazzles, Then It Disappoints

How important is a single shot? Not a sequence, nor an edit. Can a solitary, unbroken shot make or break a film? Can it upend one's total reception of a work? Because there is a shot at the very beginning... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Rotterdam 2016 Review: A GOOD AMERICAN Damns The Worst Of America

Austrian director Friedrich Moser is a self-confessed fan of spy stories, so it's not surprising he made a documentary about the NSA's former meta-data expert Bill Binney. Titled A Good American, the film played at the International Film Festival Rotterdam.... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: ALOYS Exhalts In Glorious Madness

Tobias Nölle's engrossing tale of a highly distinctive Swiss private eye called Aloys is perhaps the first film of 2016 which has truly made me get excited and want to start bouncing off the walls like an excessively caffeinated critic.... More »
By Thomas Humphrey   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: CROSSCURRENT Channels The Poetry Of Confusion

Yang Chao's tale of two lovers woven into the meandering course of the epic Yangtze river is sadly the only Chinese-language film to feature in Berlinale's main competition this year, seeing it follow in the footsteps of Black Coal, Thin... More »
By Thomas Humphrey   
  

Review: EMBRACE OF THE SERPENT, A Spiritual Quest With A Political Regret

Inspired by Theodor Koch-Grunberg and Richard Evans Schultes, the first explorers of the Colombian Amazon, Embrace of the Serpent is a spiritual quest with a political regret. We follow two stories of German explorers (one of them is Jan Bijvoet... More »
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: BADEN BADEN, A Promising Yet Frustrating Debut

An amiably aimless jaunt set in the French city of Strasbourg (and not the German spa town of its title) Baden Baden has much in common with its main character, an amiably aimless misfit just coasting through life. Both main... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: THINGS TO COME Artfully Tells A Tale As Old As Time

Everything new is old again (or is it the other way around?) in Mia Hansen-Love's elegant and understated take on the cycles of life, Things To Come. With an astute eye and a sensitive-if-hardly-mushy script, Hansen-Love lets us know... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: JIL JUNG JUK Puts A Whimsical Twist On Indian Gangster Films

Deeraj Vaidy's freshmen directorial effort Jil Jung Juk is a balls to the wall, whacked out gangster comedy that has very little equal in the world of Indian cinema. Taking influences from all over the globe to craft his twisty,... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: In FITOOR, Bollywood Places Beauty Above Substance, Again

Abhishek Kapoor's Fitoor, a Kashmir set adaptation of Charles Dickens' Great Expectations, marks yet another step on the downward spiral that is the modern Bollywood blockbuster. I hate to write lines like that, I've invested quite a bit of time and... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: FUOCOAMMARE Breaks The Wave Of Migration Documentaries

Given how long it takes to finance and make a film, you could argue that the film industry's collective consciousness has responded pretty quickly to the migration crisis which has unfolded in recent years, and Gianfranco Rosi's Fuocoammare is a moving example... More »
By Thomas Humphrey   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: THE BACCHUS LADY Gracefully Explores Bounty of Taboo Subjects

Veteran actress Youn Yuh-jung, star of such classics as Kim Ki-young's Woman on Fire (1971) and The Insect Woman (1972), takes on perhaps her boldest role yet in The Bacchus Lady. Directed by E J-yong, appearing in the Berlinale program... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  
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