Review: SET FIRE TO THE STARS, A Tribute To A Poet, Poetry, And Cinema

It isn't easy to portray the literary arts on screen. Apart from having someone recite from a book (which can become tedious), the challenge becomes how to find the connection between the writer being portrayed, their work, and how that... More »
  

Review: REDEEMER, Creative Beyond The Visceral Fight Scenes

Ernesto Diaz Espinoza has long been a favorite director in the Twitch world. His impressive ability to keep the action flowing while dabbling in different subgenres has always been commendable. In Mirageman, Diaz Espinsoza married lo-fi action with the tropes... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Review: THE STRANGER, A Vampire Film That Doesn't Scream About It

Directed by Guillermo Amoedo and executive produced by Eli Roth and Nicolas Lopez (who collaborated on Aftershock, The Green Inferno, and home invasion thriller Knock, Knock with Keanu Reeves), The Stranger is a vampire film that doesn't scream that it's... More »
  

Blu-ray Review: CANNIBAL FEROX, A Vile And Repulsive Film With A Stunning Home Video Release

Let me just get this out there: I hate Cannibal Ferox. I want potential readers to understand the place from which I am coming before you decide whether or not to pay my opinion any mind. Cannibal Ferox is a... More »
By Charlie Hobbs   
  

Review: JURASSIC WORLD, When Brand(ed) Chaos Reigns

Jurassic Park was the event movie of my childhood. In the summer of 1993, I was 9 years old. Amidst my enthusiasm for Batman, X-Men, and all things Star Wars, I was compelled and fascinated by the world of dinosaurs.... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Transylvania Film Festival 2015 Review: THE FOOL, A Hero's Journey to The Gutter

The uncontrollable proliferation of superhero films (and other superhero commodities) and the return to the hero myth  popularized by tales from ancient Greece might indicate a sudden need for a messiah figure in the contemporary wasteland. An ordinary man... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Sydney 2015 Review: ON THE RIM OF THE SKY, The New Challenges The Old

In the Chinese province of Sichuan, one of the mountains is so high that it's literally "on the rim of the sky"; and in that mountain, there is an isolated village called Gulu. The villagers' children received their education at... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Sydney 2015 Review: Witness Undying Love In MY LOVE, DON'T CROSS THAT RIVER

He was 98. She was 89. They were married for 76 years, had 12 children, six of whom died during their childhood. That is the story of Jo Byeong-man and Kang Gye Yeol, as told in director Jin Mo-young's My... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Review: POLICE STORY: LOCKDOWN, Another Jackie Chan Letdown

A sequel in name only to Jackie Chan's hugely popular action series, this latest offering moves proceedings to mainland China for a small scale, straight-faced and relatively thrill-free drama with a tendency to pontificate about civil responsibility.Jackie Chan's Police Story... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: A PIGEON SAT ON A BRANCH REFLECTING ON EXISTENCE

Only a few living directors have achieved status in world cinema as Roy Andersson did. Calling him a cult director seems like a huge understatement, even though we are talking about a rather narrow body of work consisting of three features... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Fantaspoa 2015 Review: Sam's POSSESSED Presents An Exorcism With Clay And A Fragmented Script

Possessed (aka Pos eso) is a peculiar Spanish animation which recalls the claymation classics of Wallace and Gromit for the design of its characters - after all the director Sam worked as an animator for Aardman - but not due to... More »
  

Review: TU DORS NICOLE, A Wry Slacker Comedy From Quebec

Quebec based filmmaker Stéphane Lefleur's wry slacker comedy Tu dors Nicole (You Are Sleeping, Nicole) stars Julianne Côté in the title role of Nicole, a 20-something young woman with one foot still firmly lodged in childhood and the other slightly... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: UNCERTAIN TERMS, Between Romance And Delusion

We are walking down a serene wooded path. With our back to us is a redheaded girl, her hair in a long, tight braid, her shoulders slumped forward. She's walking through the woods, pondering her very existence: Why is she... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: Kurzel's MACBETH Is Shakespeare For The GAME OF THRONES Crowd

Justin Kurzel's Snowtown was a remarkable film, a brash feature debut that signaled the emergence of a unique talent joining a slew of them coming out of the Australian independent scene. Following up a powerful true crime story with... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: RAMS, An Exceptional Tale Of Exceptional Stubbornness

Oh, Iceland. With your otherworldly landscapes and ability to extract cool, dry drama like you're farming permafrost, your cinema is like your vistas -  inspiring and intimidating. Add to that some of the special spice that has made the... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Jeonju 2015 Review: UNWANTED BROTHER Puts Onus On Characters In Familiar Setting

After nearly a decade away from the director's chair, Shim Kwang-jin returns with an unhurried take on a common tale of a lowlife manipulating those around him to pay a debt. Propped up by a few fresh spins on the... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: COSMODRAMA, A French Metaphysical Star Trek

Science-fiction has never taken particularly strong roots in French cinema despite being born in hands of a certain Monsieur Meliés on French soil. And Gallic helmer Phillipe Fernandez is not likely to alter the status quo with his sophomore feature... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: DHEEPAN, Powerful With Moments Of Sheer Bravado

It begins with chaos: shouting voices calling out in alarm, a cacophony of sound, and a flourish of a camera moving through a thick crowd. It ends with similar sounds and a similar shot, one far less sinister and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: KRISHA Introduces An Exciting New Director In The Home Movie From Hell

Jean-Luc Godard once said that all you need for a movie is a gun and a girl. With Krisha, a rich psychological thriller about family secrets, mental-breakdown and addiction, director Trey Edward Shults proves that one can make compelling... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE, A Melancholy Animated Mystery

Studio Ghibli and its catalogue of extraordinary animated films has been built on the back of two men: the creator of its most beloved characters and star of the studio, Miyazaki Hayao and the often over-looked, but no less talented,... More »
  
  Next »
Page 2 of 277