Cannes 2015 Review: COIN LOCKER GIRL Offers New Perspectives On Standard Thrills

Against a parking lot bursting with saturated colors, a person lies on the ground, at the mercy of another standing above them who wields a sashimi knife still dripping red from its last kill. Dark, bloody and stylish, this could... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: BOMBAY VELVET Takes A Gorgeous Look At Jazz Age Hoodlums

If there's anything that Bombay Velvet director Anurag Kashyap has taught us over his last couple of films, it's that he knows how to stage a rousing action sequence. Not only did he create the greatest gangster film of the... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: THE SHAMELESS Delivers Hardboiled Melodrama With Top Drawer Performances

"Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist." -Pablo Picasso Today's Korea, whether looking at its entertainment, fashion or culinary scenes, is a society awash with fusion. Nowhere is this more true than in... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: GOOD KILL Intelligently Examines Drone Warfare

"Keep compartmentalizing" is a piece of advice from a commanding officer to his ace pilot. This is darkly humourous, intelligent screenwriting because these drone-piloting soldiers spend 12 hours a day literally inside a box, albeit an air-conditioned one filled... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SON OF SAUL, A Wrenching, Riveting Holocaust Tale

Son of Saul has two obvious strikes against it. It's a handheld, close POV movie, usually the sign of filmmakers too austere to pick up a tripod, eschewing good framing in favour of shakycam "grit." Then there's the subject... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SLEEPING GIANT, Provocative And Probing

Despite a seemingly endless number of tries, pulling off the 'coming-of-age' film well is miserably difficult. There's a balance between precociousness versus pandering that makes the balance extremely delicate, as complex and awkward as any pubescence. When it goes... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Jeonju 2015 Review: ISLAND, An Elegiac Arthouse Mystery

A man travels to Jeju Island, planning to kill himself in his grandparents' abandoned home, in the most intriguing Korean film to grace the Jeonju International Film Festival this year. A lushly filmed and thoroughly engrossing mystery channeling local family... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: Téchiné's IN THE NAME OF MY DAUGHTER, Another Strong Outing From The Master Of Psychological Dramas

Based on the memoir of Renée Le Roux about the disappearance of her daughter Agnes, André Téchiné, the French master of subtle psychological dramas, tackles real life intrigue with In the Name of My Daughter. The Le Roux case held... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: DARK STAR: H.R. GIGER'S WORLD, An Intimate Look At H. R. Giger, Channeling Dark Side Of The Human Soul

Hans Ruedi Giger, the artist known for his nightmarish vision, passed away in 2014 at the age of 74. Luckily for us, Swiss documentarian Belinda Sallin has made a comprehensive, yet intimate portrayal of the artist just before his passing.... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: THE CONNECTION, An Entirely Redundant Tale

The Connection (titled La French in its native county) has the makings of a great film, which is what makes the final product such a disappointment. Drawing upon the same case that was the basis for the William Friedkin... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Indian Film Festival Los Angeles 2015 Review: DHANAK Will Open Your Eyes To The Power Of Hope

In Nagesh Kukunoor's Dhanak, a young boy and his slightly older sister trek hundreds of miles across the desert of Rajasthan in India in search of a cure to the boy's blindness. The trek is long, and not without its... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: MAD MAX: FURY ROAD, A Tour De Force Masterpiece

How's this for hyperbole: George Miller is the Australian Spielberg. You've got a director with a wide diversity of films (from The Road Warrior to Babe to Happy Feet), all injected with an almost preternaturally gifted ability to have... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

LA Asian 2015 Review: THE CHINESE MAYOR Manages To Be Portrait And Landscape

The documentary scene in China is difficult to approach, especially when so many of the works are strictly forbidden to be shown there. With so many independent film festivals being banned and even raided by Chinese government officials, it's truly... More »
  

Review: Wicked And Witty INSIDE NO.9 Brings Innovation to Television Comedy

The apocalyptic prophecies about the impending doom of television did not materialise and serialized (television) fiction blossoms thanks to alternative distribution channels. Apart from the technological upgrade to hybrid television and the enhancement of consumer´s interactivity and transmediality, the... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Review: SAINT LAURENT, Drinking, Screwing Around, And Smoking Like A Chimney

The gilded life of fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent has received the big screen treatment twice in recent times. The first was the paint by the numbers biopic Yves Saint Laurent, a gentle, actor's film made with the full collaboration... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: SKIN TRADE Trades On Ensemble Face-Kicking

Thirty years after its explosive heyday, Dolph Lundgren is here to show us how little action movies and muscle-led cinema have evolved. And yet, we're meant to think that they have. In 1985, Rambo won the Vietnam War. It was a... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Udine 2015 Review: THE END OF THE WORLD AND THE CAT'S DISAPPEARANCE, A Quirky Little Sci-Fi Film

Takeuchi Michihiro's The End of the World and the Cat's Disappearance, a zany, modestly packaged apocalyptic sci-fi film revolving around Itsuko (Izukoneko aka Mari), a vlogger-cum-J-pop-idol who attempts to singlehandedly save the world from a gigantic meteor, but ends up... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Udine 2015 Review: FORGET ME NOT, A Touching Mixture Of Fantasy, Mystery, And Teen Romance

One of the most affecting and enigmatic teen-targeted Japanese films of the last few years, Horie Kei's Forget Me Not (not to be mistaken with Hirayama Hideyuki's 2010 drama that bears the same English title) defies easy categorization, veering confidently... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Udine 2015 Review: PORT OF CALL Proves Philip Yung's Most Ambitious And Polished Film To Date

A decidedly bleak yet surprisingly meditative exploration of the lower depths of contemporary Hong Kong, Philip Yung's Port of Call clearly articulates its genre-bending aspirations and effectively taps into the generational anxieties of youth today. Based on a case that... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Hot Docs 2015 Review: The "Fuckery & Shenanigans" Of FINDERS KEEPERS

What would you do if you acquired a storage locker and all its random contents, only to discover one such item consisted of a barbecue containing a human foot? I guess the answer largely depends on who you are. If... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  
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