Review: Garrel's IN THE SHADOW OF WOMEN Finds Infidelity Is An Equal Opportunity Offender

Philippe Garrel, known for making films about deeply self-reflexive romantic entanglements since the late 60s, is at it again with In the Shadows of Women. Infidelity, art, improvisation, one-take scenes, shot in monochrome on film and natural settings have been... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Blu-ray Review: Criterion's BITTER RICE Is A Savory Dish

Cinephiles and historians can (and do) debate about which postwar Italian movies were a "betrayal" of the intentionally cultivated neorealism movement. But more plainly, a case could be made that neorealism got tired of itself. Or, more readily, Italian neorealism... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: MOOR, A Story Of Broken Tracks, Broken Lives, And Building Hope

It seems as though no matter where you look in Pakistan these days, the spectre of British imperial rule looms over the nation in ways that are perhaps so deeply ingrained in the fabric of the nation that's it... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: DIABLO, A Western That Makes Its Genre Generic

The Western film genre, a main staple of American movies decades ago, but nowadays much scarcer, is currently enjoying a mini-revival, spearheaded by the current 70mm roadshow release of Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight, in which Tarantino continues to marry... More »
  

Review: PARTISAN, A Chilling Take On Coming Of Age

Under the diligent guidance of institutions like Screen Australia, Australia seems to have become a very promising country for new emerging directors, and Ariel Kleiman is no exception. Within seconds of his uncompromising first feature's opening, it soon becomes apparent... More »
By Thomas Humphrey   
  

Review: INSIDE MEN, A Political Thriller That Goes For The Jugular

The year is almost up, the box office has been tallied and the people have spoken. Stories of greedy corporate heirs, crooked clergy, conniving journalists and dirty politicians have risen to the top of the pile, each more acerbic than... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: YOUTH... Without Youth

The older one gets, the less anything matters. So goes the observed mentality of the two main characters of Youth. Wealth is evident, opulence is everywhere, yet the souls of these people have only grown increasingly wanting. So wanting that that... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: SON OF SAUL, A Unique Holocaust Horror Story

Son of Saul has two obvious strikes against it. It's a handheld, close POV movie, usually the sign of filmmakers too austere to pick up a tripod, eschewing good framing in favour of shakycam "grit." Then there's the subject... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: THE TIGER, A Gory, Gorgeous Battle To The Death

Following the record-breaking success of Roaring Currents, Choi Min-sik returns to screens in another big-budget period epic, this time hunting down the last Korean tiger (as opposed to the last tiger in Korea, because this feline clearly has a national... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: LUNA DE MIEL (HONEYMOON) And Its Twisted Views On Love And Survival

Isabel lives across the street from Jorge, a doctor who lives alone in an immaculate home. To say that Jorge is infatuated with Isabel is a bit of an understatement. When Luna De Miel (Honeymoon) opens we see that Jorge... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Review: THE HIMALAYAS Swaps Snowflakes For Tears

For those looking for an expedition drama, be warned that despite its title, The Himalayas is first and foremost a melodrama. One concerning brotherhood, family and, above all, coping with grief. Himalayan expedition films seem to be in vogue at... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: THE WORLD OF KANAKO Goes Down A Cinematic Rabbit Hole

The first two minutes of Nakashima Tetsuya's violent and unrelenting The World of Kanako are a litmus test on whether one should proceed. A frenetic orgy of editing non sequiturs, both assaulting and attention grabbing, occurs right before slamming into... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: MACBETH, Injected With Dread And Cool

Justin Kurzel's Snowtown was a remarkable film, a brash feature debut that signaled the emergence of a unique talent joining a slew of them coming out of the Australian independent scene. Following up a powerful true crime story with... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: IN THE HEART OF THE SEA, Old-Fashioned In The Best Possible Way

Billed as the story that inspired Moby Dick, Ron Howard's adaptation of Nathaniel Philbrick's National Book Award winner is a shamelessly old-fashioned sea-faring yarn recounting the true story of the Essex, a Nantucket whaleship that sank after being attacked by... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: DAWN, A Surreal Image Of Soviet Life

Tales of mythic figures, particularly those whose myth is perpetuated by governments, are ripe fodder for film. This can be especially interesting if someone like myself is ignorant of said mythic figure. Such is the case with Dawn, Laila Pakalnina's... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: THE AUTOMATIC HATE, Blood Is Not Thicker Than Water

Not all families are good or well-adjusted; there are often rifts (reasonable or not) between parents and children, siblings, cousins. Some of us might find out about skeletons in a closet, and sometimes those skeletons are best left undisturbed. In Justin... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: LOEV, Lovers In A Dangerous Time

Same-sex activity is illegal in India, punishable by imprisonment. The release there of Deepa Mehta's film Fire, about a love affair between two women, incited violent protests in 1998. So the fact that Sudhanshu Saria's debut feature Loev was made... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: THANK YOU FOR BOMBING Shines a Critical Light on War Reporting

War correspondants can be mythic figures, something of romantic heroes. They go to dangerous places in order to bring us the truth. It's been said that it was the reporter's stories that helped begin protests against the Vietnam War; although... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: BODY, The Connection Between Flesh and Spirit

Malgorzata Szumowska's previous films (Elles, In the Name Of) have looked at the conflict between mind and body, in a darkly serious tone. In her latest film Body (which won the Silver Bear for Best Director at Berlinale), she again... More »
  

Five Flavours 2015 Review: CROCODILE Drifts Through Arresting Yet Ponderous Poverty

Fable and reality mingle in Francis Xavier Pasion's Crocodile, a film riddled with beautiful imagery and terrible poverty. Based on real events and bookended by documentary footage of the story's real protagonists, the unique, swampy landscape of the Agusan Marsh... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  
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