Review: HABIBI Is An Earnest If Familiar Love Story

Susan Youssef's first feature Habibi is an earnest if not entirely impressive tale of forbidden love set in Israeli-occupied Palestine. While the film does stir and touch at appropriate moments, the threads of a tried-and-true narrative ultimately fail to come... More »
By John Jarzemsky   

Telluride 2012 Review: THE ATTACK Pierces Middle-Eastern Conflicts

The complicated situation in Israel, with its uneasy peace and frequent bursts of non-peace between Jews and Arabs, has given rise to numerous compelling stories, and will no doubt continue to do so for as long as there is conflict... More »
By Eric D. Snider   

Review: FOOTNOTE achieves moving feats of note

What is it to love your enemy? That's not a question I hear very often at the movies. That's a question I hear at church. It's been said that the two, movie going and church going, aren't as different as... More »
By Jim Tudor   

Series Preview: New Directors/New Films Offers Up a Feast of Fresh Cinematic Treats

2012 marks the 41st year in which The Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Museum of Modern Art present to New York City audiences an intriguing and exciting new set of films and filmmakers from across the globe in... More »
By Ben Umstead   

Series Preview: Nina Menkes Retro at New York's Anthology Film Archives

"It took me a long time to understand my own film." That's writer-director Nina Menkes on what may be her best known work, The Bloody Child (1996). To say that it uses reverse-chronology to tell the based-on-true-events tale of a... More »
By Peter Gutierrez   


This is Not a Film is not a film. Not in a conventional sense anyway. Rather, it's a 75-minute documentation of an idling film director who has been banned from filmmaking, screenwriting, leaving the country and giving interviews for... More »
By Dustin Chang   

Twitch Takes an In-Depth Look at Foreign Language Oscar Submissions

This year, 63 countries submitted films to the Academy for award consideration as Best Foreign Language Film . Very few of these have played in US as of yet and some with only limited qualifying runs in their home countries.... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   

NYFF 2011: Team Twitch Wraps Up: Part 2

Aannd we're back with part 2 of Peter Gutierrez and Aaron Krasnov's wrap up of the 49th annual New York Film Festival. Part 1 can be found here. And now... a veritable NYFF blow-out with the dynamic duo dropping some... More »
By Ben Umstead   

Daggers: The Short Festival Of Short Horror: A Preview

If you're in NYC and reading this then you will most definitely want to consider heading out this Thursday, the 20th, or Saturday, the 22nd to the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) for the third edition of Daggers: The... More »
By Ben Umstead   


This Is Not A Film (Mojtaba Mirtahmasb, 2011). The amount of humor in Jafar Panahi and Mojtaba Mirtahmasb's hybrid effort is surprising, especially in light of the serious and well-publicized censure of Panahi's filmmaking by Iranian authorities. But perhaps there... More »
By Michael Guillen   


"The only real important filmmakers at the moment are the thousand and thousand YouTube providers."--Heddy Honigmann, in a Facebook entry dated Wednesday, March 12, 2011. The Disposable Film Festival (DFF) and YouTube co-presented a special free screening of Oscar®-winning film... More »
By Michael Guillen   


Joe (Veronica Kedar) is a young and very cynical drug dealer. She lives in Israel but dreams of a far away land. Belle (Sivan Levy) is a suicidal beauty with a romantic soul who just got out of a mental... More »
By Aharon Keshales   

Tribeca 2011: Team Twitch Wraps Up

This evening sees the 10th edition of the Tribeca Film Festival come to a close. My gallant colleague, Peter Gutierrez and I would like to thank the staff and volunteers, publicists and assistants for making TFF 2011 quite a cool... More »
By Ben Umstead   


Corporate arrogance mixed with media meddling lead to a 1000+-kilometer trip of interpersonal discovery in the Israeli film "The Human Resource Manager". If dehumanization is the central moral examination of the film, then offbeat quirk is the modus operandi. From... More »
By Jim Tudor   

SFIFF54: A Dozen

[Our thanks to Frako Loden for offering this egg carton's worth of reviews to Twitch.] For this year's San Francisco International Film Festival (SFIFF54), I have yet to go on a screener binge--that starts later today--so I'll be attending festival... More »
By Michael Guillen   

Tribeca 2011 Review: RABIES

The Tribeca programming notes, which contend that Rabies (Kalevet) is "worthy of its mantle as Israel's first-ever horror film," aren't exactly as encouraging as they seem to feel they are. After all, do you really want the film you're seeing... More »
By Peter Gutierrez   

ND/NF 2011 Review: Microphone

Watching Microphone now, which is basically a love letter to Alexandria, is all the more poignant considering what's been happening in Egypt for the last few months. Director Ahmad Abdalla succeeds in capturing the essence of the youth culture in... More »
By Dustin Chang   


Like myself, both Doug Cummings and David D'Arcy caught Jafar Panahi's Offside when it screened at the 2006 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF). At Film Journey, Doug Cummings characterized Offside as Panahi's "most vibrantly energetic and entertaining film to date,... More »
By Michael Guillen   

SFIAAFF 2011: Review Capsules

[Our thanks to Michael Hawley for providing his capsule reviews for SFIAAFF 2011.] The 29th edition of the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival (SFIAAFF) begins this evening Thursday, March 10 and runs through March 20 at various Bay... More »
By Michael Guillen   


[Our thanks to Frako Loden for her capsule reviews from SFIAAFF 2011.] Over the course of attending press screenings and viewing over a dozen screener DVDs, I kept changing my mind about the overall quality of the offerings in the... More »
By Michael Guillen   
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