Review: GOODNIGHT MOMMY, An Unsettling Nightmare

Austrian arthouse horror Goodnight Mommy gets under your skin early and stays there long after the credits. Within its sparse and sterile decor, this minutely observed chamber piece tears apart the constructs of the family drama. Following an accident, a... More »
By Pierce Conran   

Review: BREATHE, Melanie Laurent's Acutely Observed Teen Drama Surprises

On the onset, Breathe, an ingenue actress turned director Melanie Laurent (Inglourious Basterds, Beginners)'s sophomore effort, seems to be just another typical sweet, slightly lascivious coming of age French fare with beautiful, young actresses. Rather, the film slowly charts an... More »
By Dustin Chang   


The newest model in the Transporter series is much the same as the previous versions, only with less wit and less cohesive action sequences. Not that the first three films were exactly paradigms of wit and cohesive action. Back in... More »
By Peter Martin   

Review: BLIND, A Stunning, Sensitive Ode To The Lonely

What we see: A street in Oslo, Norway. A dress shop. Pedestrians stream on by. Standing inside of the shop is a German Shepard. It Barks. Spittle hits the window. Pedestrians stream on by. What we hear: A woman's voice,... More »
By Ben Umstead   

Review: TURBO KID, Made With The Right Kind Of Secret Ingredient

(Gory equals glory with lots of guts!) Saying Turbo Kid is Mad Max on BMX-bikes may be a quick description, and not exactly misleading, but it's also selling the film a bit short. For starters it fails to show Turbo... More »
By Ard Vijn   

Blu-ray Review: BIG GAME's Unrated Version Has A Better 'Finnish'

Jalmari Helander's action flick Big Game will hit Blu-ray today. We have had a look at the Blu-ray release which may be sparse in added features but the sole feature, an Unrated Version with an extra five minutes of footage,... More »
By Andrew Mack   

Blu-ray Review: A BLADE IN THE DARK, From 88 Films

Director Lamberto Bava is probably most famous for being the son of legendary Italian director Mario Bava. The elder Bava is one of those filmmakers whose work is ubiquitous among hardcore horror fans, but his reach beyond that is minimal. Nevertheless,... More »
By Charlie Hobbs   

Review: JOURNEY TO ROME, Imaginary Embroidery Reigns Over Spiritual Comedy

One of the most common mistakes of filmmaking neophytes is an adamant effort to ram a wagon of ideas into their first outing even at the cost of crippling the final result. The credo, 'I am doing a big film... More »
By Martin Kudlac   

Review: THE GREEDY TIFFANY, A Feat In Czech Genre Production

Genre production does not really thrive in Czech Republic. The contrary seems to be the case, and it appears to be rather an endangered species. This year saw the release of two horror films of the same breed (found footage). While... More »
By Martin Kudlac   

Review: PRINCE, Innocence Triumphs Over Thug Life

Young Dutch filmmaker Sam de Jong's debut film Prince has all the stereotypical elements that make up a so-called gangsta movie: guns, drugs, babes, bling-blings and expensive sports mobiles. But underneath all its macho posturing, inner-city working class clichés and... More »
By Dustin Chang   

Review: WE COME AS FRIENDS, Shadows Of Colonial Past Still Loom Over South Sudan

Hubert Sauper, a Paris based filmmaker known for his searing eco-disaster exposé in Tanzania, Darwin's Nightmare (2005), continues to document the African continent in his new documentary, We Come As Friends. This time, he sheds light on the post-referendum era... More »
By Dustin Chang   

Review: LA DAME DANS L'AUTO, Between Seduction and Manipulation It Manipulates

After a successful career as an illustrator and as a writer, Joann Sfar tackled the medium of cinema in 2010 when he directed Gainsbourg (Vie héroïque), a beautiful and surprisingly oneiric biopic about the famous French singer. He then followed... More »

Review: HORSE MONEY, Beautiful, Mesmerizing, And Striking

Horse Money is astonishingly beautiful in its visual poetry! Pedro Costa, who wanted to capture the life in Lisbon's ghetto area called Fontainhas in the late 90s, made a beautiful film called Bones (Ossos). During the shoot, he saw much... More »
By Dustin Chang   

Review: PHOENIX, A Noir Revenge Flick

Christian Petzold (Ghosts, Barbara), perhaps one of the most gifted storytellers working in cinema today, strikes gold again with Phoenix, a Hitchcockian, postwar noir revenge flick. Clocking in at a very lean 98 minutes, the film revolves around a concentration camp survivor named... More »
By Dustin Chang   

Blu-ray Review: KILL LA KILL Finishes With A Bang

(No, not THAT kind of bang, you filthy...) Last December, Scottish distributor Anime Ltd. released their first boxset of Kill La Kill, which was pretty much kick-ass and which I reviewed here. Now, just over half a year later, the... More »
By Ard Vijn   

Review: ALLELUIA, The Horrifying Twist Of A True Story

The madness and obsession of love is a recurring theme in Fabrice de Welz's first two films Calvaire and Vinyan, and his latest, Alleluia, continues this trend. Taking on the infamous tale of the Honeymoon Killers (an American couple who conned... More »

Review: MR. HOLMES, The World's Greatest Detective Investigates Old Age

According to Guiness World Records, Sherlock Holmes is the most portrayed fictional character, by more than 70 actors in over 200 films, plays and television shows. I haven't seen all of those, but Ian McKellen can certainly put his performance... More »

Scandinavian 2015 Review: SILENT HEART, A Tragic Chamber Piece

Silent Heart is a fast-moving character drama that all takes place over a weekend in a country home in Denmark. The home belongs to elderly couple Poul (Morten Grunwald) and Esther (Ghita Nørby), who is dying. She plans to... More »

Scandinavian 2015 Review: In HERE IS HAROLD, Ikea Looms Over Blackly Comic Trauma

Here Is Harold kicked off the Scandinavian Film Festival last night in typically dour, dark and chillingly humorous style; muted comedy peaked through a very basic tale of revenge stemming from the wrong place.Harold (Bjørn Sundquist) has lost everything;... More »

Scandinavian 2015 Review: YOUNG SOPHIE BELL, A Beguiling, Sublime Mystery

Obsession, mystery, murder and betrayal culminate in a fragile coming-of-age story unlike any other in Amanda Adolfsson's stunning Swedish debut feature Young Sophie Bell.The titular Sophie (the radiant Felice Jankell) has just graduated high school and celebrates with her 'bestie'... More »
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