Review: BELOVED SISTERS, Characters Who Never Become Real People

More than a film about a romantic ménage a trois, Beloved Sisters is just as well the story of two sisters, two women who swear loyalty to each other and keep their oath in spite of the biggest challenge their... More »
  

Review: THE WOMAN IN BLACK 2: ANGEL OF DEATH, Tortured Souls And Stiff Upper Lips

Tortured souls abound in the sequel to The Woman in Black (2012). It's 1941, and London is under attack. Eight schoolchildren are evacuated to safety in the countryside, under the care of headmistress Jean (Helen McCrory) and teacher Eve (Phoebe... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: TAKEN 3, Action Cinema For Teenage Softies

Liam Neeson's third outing as over-protective family man Bryan Mills sees him on the run for murder after his ex-wife (Famke Janssen) turns up dead in his apartment. Forest Whitaker heads the investigation, which soon enough uncovers the involvement of... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: [REC] 4: APOCALYPSE Never Reaches The Same Heights As The Original

It's certainly been a while, but the Sitges Film Festival and its audience hasn't forgotten about [REC] and the impression it left in its 2007 edition. The film, co-directed by Paco Plaza and Jaume Balagueró won the best director and... More »
By Guillem Rosset   
  

Review: Swiss Epic NORTHMEN - A VIKING SAGA Looks Like Hollywood Fare

Assessing the merits of Claudio Fäh's Viking odyssey is a tricky task because of what it represents in the panorama of Swiss genre films. With an international cast, and production set in South Africa, Northmen - A Viking Saga is... More »
  

Review: FAR FROM MEN, A Great Viggo Mortensen Western

(How can you be Far From Men when Viggo is around?) As a preview for the upcoming International Film Festival Rotterdam next month, loyal visitors were allowed to see one of the films already: David Oelhoffen's Algeria-based western Far From... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT, Big Ideas That Play Out Brilliantly

Why did Two Days, One Night work so well for me? It's not easy to explain. This is especially the case, considering this is my first experience watching a film by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, and the fact I know... More »
  

Review: MR. TURNER, A Film That Loses Its Focus

Mike Leigh's latest offering lustfully tackles the life, work and loves of Joseph Mallord William Turner, the legendary 19th Century British artist whose landscape paintings are revered around the world. Mr. Turner is a carefully constructed film, part performance piece... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Book Review: BE SAND, NOT OIL - THE LIFE AND WORK OF AMOS VOGEL Or The Almost Lost Subversion In Cinema

When people attain a fascination with the medium of film they rarely choose a career in education. More often they become filmmakers, film critics (which is or at least should be some kind of education) and most often (like all... More »
  

Review: CHILDREN, A Lyrical Look At Patrimonial Relationships And Moral Crises

After Juraj Lehotský´s recent Miracle, Jaro Vojtek, another Slovak documentarian, has turned to fiction territory, debuting with the gently titled film Children. Vojtek is no stranger to the domestic audience. He rose to prominence with the documentary Here We Are... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Blu-ray Review: KILL LA KILL Kicks Ass And Has A UK Boxset

(For those with a sailor-suit fetish and/or a certain sense of humor, Christmas sure has arrived early...) Confession time: when the first trailer and images of the anime series Kill La Kill appeared on the Internet last year, I thought... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: THE IMITATION GAME Cannot Live Up To Its Inherent Drama

From a British nation that has had its fair share of scientific geniuses, it's perhaps no surprise that the life and work of Alan Turing has spawned its fair share of dramatic works. There have been TV versions, drama/docs, and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: NOWHERE IN MORAVIA, Czech Gothic Painted In Bleak Comedy

Czech actor, theatre director and chief of the theatre Dejvické Divadlo, Miroslav Krobot, possessing as diverse acting experience on top of the directing work as playing the lead in Bela Tarr´s The Man from London or having himself rotoscoped for the Alois... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Morbido Fest 2014 Review: FEED THE LIGHT, Beware The Sparkling Dust

Never separate a mother from her child. Sara is torn away from her daughter Jenny in the opening minutes of Feed the Light, a new film by Swedish director Henrik Möller that teeters between bad dreams and outright nightmares. Still... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: V/H/S VIRAL Delivers Another Mixed Bag Of Horror

V/H/S brought us stories from Ti West, Adam Wingard, Glen McQuaid, and Joe Swanberg, among others. V/H/S 2 gave us far superior films from Gareth Evans and Timo Tjahjanto, Gregg Hale and Eduardo Sanchez, Jason Eisener, Simon Barrett, and Adam... More »
  

Los Cabos 2014 Review: THULETUVALU Showcases The Consequences Of Global Warming

The documentary ThuleTuvalu is here to connect the Pacific Ocean island Tuvalu with the small town of Thule in northern Greenland. Never as visceral as the doc Leviathan, though still quite graphic, Matthias von Gunten's effort firstly exposes the world... More »
  

Lisbon & Estoril 2014 Review: Abel Ferrara's PASOLINI Hits Some, Misses Some

Abel Ferrara's take on Pier Paolo Pasolini's life (more than his career as a filmmaker, poet or philosopher) is the breed of biopic that seems modest and straightforward enough to make up for its obvious shortcomings. Its modesty comes from... More »
By Pedro Ponte   
  

Review: OPEN WINDOWS Thrills And Chills

Early on in Open Windows, Spanish filmmaker Nacho Vigalondo invites easy comparisons to Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window, but then, pardon the expression, he throws them out the window. What begins as an homage quickly morphs into a thriller with its... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: DOCTOR WHO S8E10, IN THE FOREST OF THE NIGHT (Or, London's Overgrown)

We rarely see the Doctor as ineffective as he is here, floundering and lacking plans or ideas in the aftermath of the entire world being transformed into an enormous forest. "In the Forest of the Night" is, for the most part,... More »
By Simon Cocks   
  

DVD Review: SOULMATE Offers Plenty Of Creepy Atmosphere

Axelle Carolyn's Soulmate is the kind of film that will inspire all sorts of reviews based upon a critics particular dispensation. Not scary enough to be a thriller, not bloody enough for gorehounds, and not paced quickly enough for those... More »
By J Hurtado   
  
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