Review: NYMPHOMANIAC VOLUME II Brings The Pain...

The day after I reviewed Lars Von Trier's Nymphomaniac Volume 1, as spoiler-free as possible, I ran back to the cinema for the premiere of Nymphomaniac Volume 2, and this leaves me in a rather uncomfortable spot for reviewing it.... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: THE WORD Explains The Mechanics Of Manipulative Revenge

From the very beginning a deep sense of an impending tragedy pervades The Word (Obietnica), Polish filmmaker Anna Kazejak's naturalistic and somber coming-of-age thriller, creating a strangely disturbing yet thoroughly intriguing aura of uneasiness around the two main characters. A... More »
  

Review: THE INHERITANCE 2 (Dědictví aneb kurvaseneříká) Packs A Social Satire In A Time Capsule

The year 2014 is certainly the year of sequels for Czech cinema. A beloved cult film, The Inheritance or Fuckoffguysgoodday, got a sequel (and several others are getting ready for a release), an event that only few would say will come true.... More »
  

Review: THE TENDER WAVES (Nežné vlny) Delivers Retro Maudlinism

Czech filmmaker Jiří Vejdělek has acquired the status of a successful commercial filmmaker with several domestic romantic comedies, Men in Temptation and Women in Temptation. His latest film, The Tender Waves, also falls under the niche of romantic comedy. (After a... More »
  

Review: BLOOD TIES Knots Up 1970s New York

To call Guillaume Canet's Blood Ties a love letter to the 1970s is a bit of an understatement. The Clive Owen, Billy Crudup brothers-on-opposite-sides-of-the-law drama absolutely oozes with 1970s nostalgia, from its impeccable costume and production design to its almost... More »
  

Review: NYMPHOMANIAC: VOLUME I Teases And Entices

When discussing Lars Von Trier's Nymphomaniac within team Twitch, I suddenly realized a couple of things that surprised me. One, that I've never been disappointed yet by a Lars Von Trier film. Two, how few Lars Von Trier films I've... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

ND/NF 2014 Review: THE VANQUISHING OF THE WITCH BABA YAGA Is A Ravishing Meditation On Our Relationship With Nature

As a lover of old, rustic folktales and being married to a descendant of an eastern European Jew, Baba Yaga holds a special place in my heart. Creepier and more twisted than the Grimm Bros' tales, Baba Yaga tells a... More »
  

ND/NF 2014 Review: OF HORSES AND MEN Is A Delightfully Deadpan Comedy From Iceland

Iceland's most celebrated theater director, Benedikt Erlingsson, makes a film debut with Of Horses and Men, a wry, episodic tales of love and death in a small community all reflected on the eyes of the much coveted Icelandic horses. The... More »
  

Rotterdam 2014 Review: SORROW AND JOY Could Not Be More Aptly Named

(Ever loved something you expected to hate? THIS FILM!) This year, the International Film Festival Rotterdam dedicated a whole section of its "Signals" program to Danish director Nils Malmros. As I was not really aware of his work, this event... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

SXSW 2014 Review: AMONG THE LIVING, A Horrifying Case of Boys Will Be Boys

For many horror fans it feels like a lot of the most exciting contributions to the genre these days are coming from France.  This is, at least in part, thanks to Alexandre Bustillo & Julien Maury's 2007 shocker Inside, a... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Review: STONES FOR THE RAMPART Is A Serviceable Ode To Young War Heroes

There are two conflicting perspectives on how to approach Robert Glinski's Stones for the Rampart (Kamienie na szaniec). The first, and the more advisable one, makes the viewing experience increasingly pleasurable. It's based on an assumption that the forenamed film... More »
  

SXSW 2014 Review: OPEN WINDOWS Never Shuts Down Its Thrill Ride

Early on in Open Windows, Spanish filmmaker Nacho Vigalondo invites easy comparisons to Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window, but then, pardon the expression, he throws them out the window. What begins as an homage quickly morphs into a thriller with its... More »
  

Review: THE UNI (Vejška) Awkwardly Balances Generational Manifesto And Capitalist Fairy-tale

In 2007, Czech director Tomáš Vorel sr. made a film called The Can, an adaption of the book Graffiti Rules. As the name of the source material suggests, the main motif was graffiti and hip hop subculture, something that... More »
  

SXSW 2014 Review: WETLANDS Paints An Excitingly Vulgar Picture

When a film begins with a teenage girl deliberately smearing her genitals all over an especially disgusting public toilet seat, you pretty much have an idea what you're in for. Wetlands, director David Wnendt's sophomore feature after the award winning Nazi... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: IN FEAR Takes A White-Knuckle Ride On A Dark Night

New couple Tom and Lucy are on their way to a music festival, to meet up with friends, camp, and explore their new relationship, when things go terribly awry. In Fear opens with Lucy in the loo of a pub,... More »
  

Review: HONEY, A Beautifully Nuanced Directorial Debut From Actress Valeria Golino

Irene (Jasmine Trinca) lives alone by the ocean and has a peculiar job -- assisting deaths in terminally ill patients and their families by observing and providing poison used in putting down sick pets. Assisted suicide is a taboo subject... More »
  

Review: Emotional Drama LOVING Searches For Truth About The Mechanics Of Love

In an impassioned and perceptive manner, Loving (Milosc) breaks down the essence of a marriage on the verge of collapse. The sharply-written script goes beyond the surface in order to expose all the ingredients crucial for the formation and further development of... More »
  

Review: AMBASSADA Has An Extremely Poor Sense Of Humor

Apparently, after all those magnificent years of creating hilarious, crowd-pleasing comedies Juliusz Machulski (Vabank, Sexmission, Kiler) has finally lost his comedic touch. His oeuvre is like an almost never-ending bag of laugh-inducing creations and a source of great joy, mostly... More »
  

Review: THE DARK VALLEY Is As American As Austria Can Get

In Andreas Prochaska's Austrian Neo-Western about an enigmatic horseman who comes to a remote Austrian village in a deserted valley everything looks like a big Hollywood production with stunning production design, costumes and make-up. The Dark Valley is then an... More »
  

Review: STALINGRAD Offers Massive Visual Spectacle But Little Else

Its US release coming on the heels of the just-wrapped Sochi Olympics, where Russia presented a noble image of itself for both domestic and international consumption, the Russian war film Stalingrad seeks to do much the same in cinematic terms. It... More »
  
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