Fantastic Fest 2014 Review: I AM HERE Explores What Happens When A Biological Clock Pops A Spring

The concept of the early middle aged woman's biological clock is well established. It's expected that as childless women reach a certain age their body will begin to tell them that it is time. Now, obviously this is a gross... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Fantastic Fest 2014 Review: AUTOMATA, Surreal Science Fiction At Its Best

Spanish filmmaker Gabe Ibáñez's long-awaited second feature Autómata is an intense and gripping dystopian story, bordering on European surrealism within a classical narrative. Certainly, many current films present a weary and negative view of humanity's future, be it death by... More »
  

Fantastic Fest 2014 Review: MY LIFE DIRECTED BY NICOLAS WINDING REFN Morphs Into A Whole New Thing

Note to filmmakers: If you capture the legendary Alejandro Jodorowsky in conversation with another filmmaker and he turns to the camera to ask you a question, be sure to lead with that. Wisely, that's what first-time filmmaker Liv Corfixen does... More »
  

Fantastic Fest 2014 Review: Strong Visuals Not Enough to Save LET US PREY

Known primarily for stuffy literary films and the odd historical potboiler, or losing its talent to more attractive industries in the English diaspora, Ireland has, in recent years, become an unlikely purveyor of impressive genre fare. Though horror films are... More »
  

Fantastic Fest 2014 Review: THE TREATMENT Flays A Serial Killer And His Victims

A murderous meal prepared with familiar ingredients, The Treatment (originally titled De Behandeling) should, by all rights, be little more than a standard potboiler. The film follows the sensational case of a serial killer who first kidnaps mother, father, and... More »
  

Fantastic Fest 2014 Review: THE MAN IN THE ORANGE JACKET Screams, Quietly

He's a rich old business executive who has just laid off one hundred workers. He's troubled as he returns home to his beautiful, isolated mansion with his lovely young wife. He needs a good night's sleep before heading to Italy... More »
  

Fantastic Fest 2014 Review: TOMBVILLE Plunges Into Nasty Nightmare Territory

A young boy is handed a gun by his mother. It is night, the boy's mother is panicked, and an armed man is about to invade their home. The anxieties quickly mount in Tombville, Nikolas Last's feature directorial debut, even... More »
  

Fantastic Fest 2014 Review: WHISPERS BEHIND THE WALL, For Those Who Listen Closely

'Stand over by the window, it's better light. Good. Now why don't you take off your sweater? Good. Now why don't you take off your shirt?' Martin (Vincent Redetzki) is desperate, so he does what he's asked by Horn, the... More »
  

Fantastic Fest 2014 Review: BLIND, A Stunning, Sensitive Ode To The Lonely

What we see: A street in Oslo, Norway. A dress shop. Pedestrians stream on by. Standing on the inside of the shop is a German Shepard. It Barks. Spittle hits the window. Pedestrians stream on by. What we hear: A... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: LEVIATHAN Takes A Gorgeous And Savage Look At Modern Russia

A rundown fishing town on the coast of the Arctic Ocean is the rugged edge-of-the-world stage for Andrey Zvyagintsev's complex, but quite accessible, new film. There is a visual mastery of relating wide open natural spaces, with precise man-made interiors, present... More »
  

L'Etrange 2014 Review: THE TRIBE, No Sound, But A Whole Lot Of Fury

Not one word of dialogue is spoken in director Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy's The Tribe, a stark Ukrainian drama that mixes gang thriller with boarding school intrigue, and pushes the maxim 'show don't tell' into brutal new extremes. The film presents a... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Toronto 2014 Review: THE DUKE OF BURGUNDY, A Sublime And Specific Sex Comedy

Starting off with what is undoubtedly the opening credit sequence of the year, Peter Strickland's The Duke of Burgundy never ceases to surprise and delight over its 100 minutes, offering a dry but meticulous humour and rhythm. Those credits, offering... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: Winterbottom's THE FACE OF AN ANGEL Is A Meta-Narrative Thriller That Works

It's a dangerous thing to make a movie about making a movie. It's even more dangerous when the movie is about the writing process for the very movie the audience is watching. Not only is the meta-narrative difficult to pull... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: SPRING Is No Sophomore Slump

"You saw me all fucked up and I am still here." So says Evan (Lou Taylor Pucci) to his Italian girlfriend, Louise (Nadia Hilker), after discovering that her 'little secret' is well outside his comfort zone. It is this moment, well... More »
  

Toronto 2014 Review: CLOUDS OF SILS MARIA Will Age Gracefully

The eponymous image of Clouds of Sils Maria features a heavenly mist snaking its way through mountain peaks like a river, the rocks frozen in time, immutable, the clouds in perpetual motion.It is shown as shot for Olivier Assayas in 2014,... More »
  

Review: It's Baudrillard Revisited In Czech Anti-Rom DELIGHT

Czech director Jitka Rudolfová rejoins the ranks of emerging filmmakers worth following. Her feature debut, a sort of generational observation piece called Dreamers, focuses on a group of friends in their 30's who decide to change their aimless lives. Delight... More »
  

Review: WETLANDS, Not For The Faint Of Heart Nor Weak Of Stomach

When a film begins with a teenage girl deliberately smearing her genitals all over an especially disgusting public toilet seat, you pretty much have an idea what you're in for. Wetlands, director David Wnendt's sophomore feature after the award winning... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: DOCTOR WHO S8E02, INTO THE DALEK (Or, They Shrunk The Doctor And Put Him In A Dalek)

Regeneration episodes tend to be anomalies, so Peter Capaldi's second installment as the Doctor was always going to be more telling as to his take on the character. The good news, then, is that he remains brilliant. This Doctor is... More »
  

Review: THE CONGRESS, Ambitious And Mostly Successful

Loosely based on the sci-fi musings of Stanislav Lem, Ari Folman follows up his Oscar-nominated Waltz With Bashir with this ambitious and mostly successful exploration of celebrity, cinema and the subconscious. One of the biggest criticisms of Cinema, and Hollywood... More »
  

Review: THE NOTEBOOK, A Chilling Tale Of Creepy Twins In WWII Hungary

The idea of viewing wartime through the eyes of children has had its share of cinematic treatments over the years. Based on a prize winning novel of the same name, Hungarian director János Szász adds The Notebook/Le Grand Cahier to that... More »
  
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