Cannes 2015 Review: DHEEPAN, Powerful With Moments Of Sheer Bravado

It begins with chaos: shouting voices calling out in alarm, a cacophony of sound, and a flourish of a camera moving through a thick crowd. It ends with similar sounds and a similar shot, one far less sinister and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: ALOFT, The Tension Between Magic Realism And Harsh Reality

The sense of touch can be tricky to convey in film. A filmmaker must rely upon visually accurate information in order for the spectator to 'feel' the sensation. Touch is very prominent in director and writer Claudia Llosa's Aloft, how... More »
  

Cannes 2015 Review: Noé's LOVE Is Both Sticky and Sweet

Gaspar Noé. For some even the name sends shudders. Thoughts of the visually bombastic Enter the Void cause a kind of PTSD, and his Irreversable still haunts some 13 years on. The Argentine-born, France-based director occupies a unique and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: MEDITERRANEA, A Humanist Masterclass On Society's Forgotten Few

Mediterranea is a powerful neorealist punch, so loaded with prescience, so relevant to our here and now, that it practically explodes off the screen. At one point in the film, a middle class family sits down to dinner and the father... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: MY GOLDEN DAYS, Nicotine-Fuelled, Incredibly French and Incredibly Good

Those allergic to French film clichés should consider running in terror from My Golden Days. The hits are all there in director Arnaud Desplechin's latest, a pseudo-prequel to his even more comically cliché-titled My Sex Life... or How I... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SON OF SAUL, A Wrenching, Riveting Holocaust Tale

Son of Saul has two obvious strikes against it. It's a handheld, close POV movie, usually the sign of filmmakers too austere to pick up a tripod, eschewing good framing in favour of shakycam "grit." Then there's the subject... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: Téchiné's IN THE NAME OF MY DAUGHTER, Another Strong Outing From The Master Of Psychological Dramas

Based on the memoir of Renée Le Roux about the disappearance of her daughter Agnes, André Téchiné, the French master of subtle psychological dramas, tackles real life intrigue with In the Name of My Daughter. The Le Roux case held... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: DARK STAR: H.R. GIGER'S WORLD, An Intimate Look At H. R. Giger, Channeling Dark Side Of The Human Soul

Hans Ruedi Giger, the artist known for his nightmarish vision, passed away in 2014 at the age of 74. Luckily for us, Swiss documentarian Belinda Sallin has made a comprehensive, yet intimate portrayal of the artist just before his passing.... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: THE CONNECTION, An Entirely Redundant Tale

The Connection (titled La French in its native county) has the makings of a great film, which is what makes the final product such a disappointment. Drawing upon the same case that was the basis for the William Friedkin... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: Wicked And Witty INSIDE NO.9 Brings Innovation to Television Comedy

The apocalyptic prophecies about the impending doom of television did not materialise and serialized (television) fiction blossoms thanks to alternative distribution channels. Apart from the technological upgrade to hybrid television and the enhancement of consumer´s interactivity and transmediality, the... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Review: SAINT LAURENT, Drinking, Screwing Around, And Smoking Like A Chimney

The gilded life of fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent has received the big screen treatment twice in recent times. The first was the paint by the numbers biopic Yves Saint Laurent, a gentle, actor's film made with the full collaboration... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Udine 2015 Review: THE END OF THE WORLD AND THE CAT'S DISAPPEARANCE, A Quirky Little Sci-Fi Film

Takeuchi Michihiro's The End of the World and the Cat's Disappearance, a zany, modestly packaged apocalyptic sci-fi film revolving around Itsuko (Izukoneko aka Mari), a vlogger-cum-J-pop-idol who attempts to singlehandedly save the world from a gigantic meteor, but ends up... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Udine 2015 Review: FORGET ME NOT, A Touching Mixture Of Fantasy, Mystery, And Teen Romance

One of the most affecting and enigmatic teen-targeted Japanese films of the last few years, Horie Kei's Forget Me Not (not to be mistaken with Hirayama Hideyuki's 2010 drama that bears the same English title) defies easy categorization, veering confidently... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Udine 2015 Review: PORT OF CALL Proves Philip Yung's Most Ambitious And Polished Film To Date

A decidedly bleak yet surprisingly meditative exploration of the lower depths of contemporary Hong Kong, Philip Yung's Port of Call clearly articulates its genre-bending aspirations and effectively taps into the generational anxieties of youth today. Based on a case that... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Udine 2015 Review: THE WICKED, An Effectively Thrilling Exercise In Low-Budget Filmmaking

Bolstered and braced by a wonderfully sinister performance from the relatively unknown young South Korean actress Park Ju-hui, Yoo Young-sun's The Wicked is a slow-paced but nicely modulated and effectively gripping exercise in low-budget indie filmmaking. Shot in a mere... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Udine 2015 Review: MAKEUP ROOM Makes Perfect Use Of Its Very Limited Location

Genuinely funny, touching, and cleverly realized, Morikawa Kei's Makeup Room (メイクルーム) plays like a modest but deft combination between a chamber-like dramedy and well-observed ensemble piece that derives most of its energy from a wealth of enthusiastic performances and witty... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Review: Quentin Dupieux's REALITY, Not Just Another Headscratcher

French DJ-cum-filmmaker Quentin Dupieux, aka Mr.Oizo, invaded the cinema landscape rather abruptly through his Dadaistic effort Rubber, following a killing tire in a twisted slasher formula. The comic element aside, Dupieux knew what he was up to since the first minute,... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Review: FAR FROM MEN, A Western In Algeria

(How can you be Far From Men when Viggo is around?) An Algeria-based western might seem like an odd idea on paper, but David Oelhoffen's Far From Men (Loin des Hommes), starring Viggo Mortensen, turns out to be a pretty... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Hot Docs 2015 Review: DRONE And The Terror Of "Point And Click" Warfare

Here in the 21st century, we find ourselves sliding down the slipperiest of slopes. As the paradigm of warfare undergoes yet another significant metamorphosis, one of remote assassinations, or as one drone pilot succinctly puts it, "just point and click."Tonje... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Imagine 2015 Review: LIZA, THE FOX-FAIRY Magnificently Kills With Kindness

This weekend, Liza, the Fox-Fairy won the Silver Méliès Award at the Imagine Film Festival Amsterdam. It was hardly the first award it won either: a few weeks earlier at Fantasporto, it won awards for Best Film and Best Special... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  
  Next »
Page 2 of 76