London Indian 2015 Review: UMRIKA Looks At The Big City Dreams & Nightmares Of Small Town Boys

Set mostly in early '80s rural northern India, Prashant Nair's Umrika pulses with universally relatable warmth and emotion. The film is the story of a young man whose older brother leaves his modest hamlet on the way to better things in... More »
By J Hurtado   

Review: AMY, A Beautiful And Tragic True Story

Every so often a film will come along that redefines an entire genre of cinema. A film that excels so completely the result is any similar film gets compared to it for years to come. In 2010, Asif Kapadia did... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   

Review: TANGERINE Pops With Verve And Vérité

On the streets of Los Angeles sunlight seems to move differently than in most places. It blazes, arching across the sky, like a banshee spreading its wings. From behind the wheel of your car, inching forward in the hellion-marked traffic... More »
By Ben Umstead   

Review: A POEM IS A NAKED PERSON Delivers More Rock, Les Blank

Although I watched the whole of A Poem is a Naked Person, I have no recollection of of that phrase being uttered. Which is unexpected, considering it's an oddly specific phrase. The keyword here is "unexpected". As a piece of... More »
By Jim Tudor   

New York Asian 2015 Review: IT'S ALREADY TOMORROW IN HONG KONG, A Charming Romantic Travelogue

Here's the basic plotline of producer and now first-time writer-director Emily Ting's immensely charming romance It's Already Tomorrow in Hong Kong, boiled down to its basic essence. A man and a woman meet, and (spoiler alert) fall in love over... More »

Review: CLOSER TO GOD, Cloning With A Conscience

Turning a hot-button issue into a dramatic soap opera would be the easy way out. Skipping over the procedures and processes that would be involved, Closer to God goes directly to the creation of a clone and then asks, "What... More »
By Peter Martin   

Review: CARTEL LAND, Mexico, Drugs, And The U.S. Battle

An astonishing journalistic achievement, Cartel Land captures in unprecedented ways the moral quagmire that inexorably links the consumers of drugs in the U.S. with the suppliers south of the border. What sets this film apart is the unique way... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Review: FELT, A United Front Of Creative Forces

There comes a moment early on in Toad Road director Jason Banker's Felt which beautifully sets the tone for what is to unfold over the next 70 or so minutes of his second narrative feature. After partying with a few young... More »
By Ben Umstead   

Review: ...IN THE DARK, You Have To Face Your Inner Demons

Indie filmmaker David Spaltro's follow up to his award-winning Things I Don't Understand, titled ...In The Dark, is an independently produced horror feature. Like Spaltro's earlier films, this is also set in modern day New York. The story concerns Bethany (Grace Folsom),... More »
By Hugo Ozman   

Review: RESULTS, Self-Absorbed To An Alarming, Insightful Degree

Polished and shiny, Andrew Bujalski's Results stands in stark visual contrast to the filmmaker's previous stylistic indulgence, Computer Chess. Shot in murky black and white with a primitive camera, Computer Chess focused on programmers at the dawn of the personal... More »
By Peter Martin   

Review: THE OVERNIGHT, Hysterically Saucy And Possibly Shocking

It's so incredibly tempting to reveal all the bizarre places Patrick Brice's new film, The Overnight, takes its audiences, who, if they're anything like this viewer, will likely watch the film with mouths gleefully agape.The film opens in the bedroom... More »
By Zach Gayne   

Review: BURYING THE EX, Of Love, Horror, And Comedy

A triumphant return for a beloved master or a sleepy reworking of now overly familiar tropes in a zombie movement that just won't die? Joe Dante's Burying The Ex is neither, really, the horror comedy showing clearly that the director... More »
By Todd Brown   

Review: INFINITELY POLAR BEAR Blows Hot And Cold

Proof that fine actors giving strong performances are not always enough to save a movie, Maya Forbes' Infinitely Polar Bear seems too preoccupied with its 70s period setting and zany family antics to pay more than vague lip service to... More »
By James Marsh   

LA Film Fest Review: I AM THALENTE, Skating On Passion, Finding Purpose

We all know the sound. That clack-scrape-whoosh of a skateboard on the sidewalk. For many of us it is as close to the sport as we get. When we hear that sound some of us move out of the way... More »
By Ben Umstead   

Blu-ray Review: THE STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEKYLL AND MISS OSBOURNE, A Twisted Tale Of Sex And Violence

Hot on the heels of Arrow Video's incredible (and incredibly sold out) Walerian Borowczyk Box set from last autumn, the company has dug deeper into the director's idiosyncratic oeuvre to deliver what is likely his most straight ahead horror feature,... More »
By Charlie Hobbs   

Review: THE WOLFPACK, A Coming Of Age Story Like No Other

I've heard about many great eccentric, downright crazy family stories that have taken place in New York's Lower East Side (LES) through friends over the years. But none was as batshit crazy as the story of The Wolfpack. The documentary... More »
By Dustin Chang   

Review: ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL Earns Every Emotional Beat

The title for Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is kind of appalling, a sing-song rhyming cadence that reminds of Lobo's buttery 1971 pop hit "Me And You and a Dog Named Boo". Its premise -- a young... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Blu-ray Review: CANNIBAL FEROX, A Vile And Repulsive Film With A Stunning Home Video Release

Let me just get this out there: I hate Cannibal Ferox. I want potential readers to understand the place from which I am coming before you decide whether or not to pay my opinion any mind. Cannibal Ferox is a... More »
By Charlie Hobbs   

Blu-ray Review: Arrow Video's SOCIETY Is A Showstopper

Before Society, Brian Yuzna was known mostly, if at all, as the producer of Stuart Gordon's iconic Re-Animator. Yuzna initially had no interest in directing, his initial interest was in being the big shot, and to him that meant producing.... More »
By J Hurtado   

Review: WE ARE STILL HERE, An Authentic, Jolting Horror Thriller

The quiet before the storm is unsettling. It's a beautiful winter day in 1979. Anne (Barbara Crampton) and Paul (Andrew Sensenig) are driving to their new life in a new home in New England. Paul drives, calmly, while Anne emotes,... More »
By Peter Martin   
  Next »
Page 4 of 40