Spokane 2015 Review: THE WOUND AND THE GIFT Exquisitely Explores The Bridge Between Human And Animal Consciousness

The phrase "animal rescue" suggests that humans are the rescuers, but The Wound And The Gift sets out to demonstrate, through gorgeous animation and exquisite cinematography, how this anthropocentric bias fails to capture the uniqueness, complexity, and reciprocity of relationships... More »
By Stuart Muller   
  

Spokane 2015 Review: The QUEENS OF ROLEO And Their Pond Monkey King

From 1958 to 1972, the small rural town of Lewiston, Idaho produced four Queens Of Roleo; women who reigned supreme in the sport of logrolling, and who together accounted for 11 World Championships in just 14 years. This would be... More »
By Stuart Muller   
  

Spokane 2015 Review: DRYLAND Combines Demolition Derbies And The Waning Of Wheat Farmers In Washington

O beautiful for spacious skies. For amber waves of grain. The Palouse region of the inland northwest is one of the wheat breadbaskets of the world. I recently relocated to this area and frequently commute from my small town of... More »
By Stuart Muller   
  

Review: THE LAST FIVE YEARS Showcases Immense Talents In Intimate Settings

It's common knowledge that a pure musical takes more than a bit of suspension of disbelief. From the first notes, you kind of have to go with the flow, taking in the abstraction as it comes. On stage, this level... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: HARUKO'S PARANORMAL LABORATORY Drowns In Quirk

(I'll never yell at my television again, lest it suddenly changes into an attractive member of the opposite sex... hey, wait-a-minute!) Last year, Japanese director Lisa Takeba presented her first feature film The Pinkie at the International Film Festival Rotterdam... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: ANOTHER TRIP TO THE MOON Is Both Sedate And Trippy

(Once upon a time, there were two beautiful young women, hunting in a forest...) What is the border between still photography and moving pictures? Footage shot by a camera pointed at a waterfall or a fireplace may technically be the... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: KNIGHT OF CUPS Sees Malick Repurposed

Rejoice ye fans of Malick - your wily transcendentalist has emerged again! And though the film doesn't equal (ahem... transcend) his previous highs, Knight Of Cups at least finds the idiosyncratic auteur trying something new. Malick's style remains the same;... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: BHOPAL: A PRAYER FOR RAIN Makes An Earnest, Sincere Entreaty

It's one thing to glance at a headline about a terrible tragedy. It's quite another to witness actions over a period of months that eventually lead to a horrifying disaster. Inspired by a true story, Bhopal: A Prayer for Rain,... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: WE ARE THE GIANT, Revolution In The Face Of Fear

You say you want a revolution. But are you willing to remain peaceful in the face of violence? Are you willing to die for your beliefs? Muhannan was a happy young man, according to the documentary We Are the Giant,... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Twitchvision: Jason Gorber Talks STILL ALICE And JUPITER ASCENDING

Back in studio this week, featuring a look at the latest film from the Wachowski siblings, Jupiter Ascending, along with the Julianne Moore-starring, Academy Award shoe-in Still Alice.Video embedded below... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: QUEEN OF EARTH Proves How Great Faces Look On Film

Alex Ross Perry is a more than promising young director. He courageously combines intimacy, humor and a sense for cinematic language and form. Nevertheless, his latest, Queen of Earth, is a step back for the young director in terms of maturity... More »
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: SET ME FREE Impressively Keeps It Real

(Here's someone literally begging to be taken to church...) In Kim Tae-yong's debut film Set Me Free (original Korean title Geo-in), he deals with the memories he has about one of the darkest moments in his own childhood. His parents... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: CALL ME LUCKY, Bobcat Goldthwait Documents His Mentor

I admit that when I first saw Bobcat Goldthwait on screen sometime in the 1980s, he of the Grover voice making me laugh in the second Police Academy movie, it never occurred to me that he'd be helming one... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: WHAT HAPPENED, MISS SIMONE?

She approaches the piano with a regality that's startling, her eyes piercing the crowd and her shoulders locked in an almost feline repose. She places a hand on the grand piano sat in front of her and looks out,... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: THE VISIT, A Speculative Documentary

So, the aliens have landed. Well, not really. But let's for a moment say they have. E.T.s are in town, and they're ready to talk. To whom do they converse? Who do we, collectively, send out to initiate the... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: THE FORBIDDEN ROOM, Weird And Wonderful

There are few things as futile (or daunting) as trying to make sense on paper of a Guy Maddin film. Save for My Winnipeg, which given its relative specificity and coherent narration serving almost as commentary for the flood... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: ENTER THE DANGEROUS MIND Exerts A Gravitational Pull

It's always the quiet ones. In Enter the Dangerous Mind, Jim (Jake Hoffman) is a quiet, unassuming, hesitant, and incredibly shy young man. He escapes into music, whaling blasts of noise and harsh beats that he shapes into accompaniment for... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: PEOPLE, PLACES, THINGS, Perfectly Pleasant

People, Places, Things - a dry, almost forgettable title that refers to a film much better than those adjectives strung together by commas. It's a quotidian moniker for a film that's kind of exceptional, celebrated not only because of... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: GLUCKAUF Combines Gritty Drama With Fantastic Acting

(What went down, must someday come up... right?) Looking at the map of the Netherlands, a few things stand out. The West and North are completely coastal, meaning the province of Limburg in the South-East is the most inland bit... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: HOMESICK Charts A Tender Symmetry Of Yearning

Norwegian filmmaker Anne Sewitsky made waves at Sundance in 2011 when her feature debut Happy Happy won the Grand Jury World Dramatic Prize. Sewitsky returned to the festival this year with her third feature, Homesick, a deconstructionist family drama which... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  
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