Review: FAR FROM MEN, A Great Viggo Mortensen Western

(How can you be Far From Men when Viggo is around?) As a preview for the upcoming International Film Festival Rotterdam next month, loyal visitors were allowed to see one of the films already: David Oelhoffen's Algeria-based western Far From... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: WINTER SLEEP, What Does It Mean To Be 'Good'?

Nuri Bilge Ceylan trained as a photographer and has mined the expressive terrain of his native Anatolia to great effect throughout his career. As a director, he has used the landscape not simply as a backdrop, but often as an... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: MAGICIAN, A Massive Collage Tribute To Orson Welles

In Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles, documentarian Chuck Workman, best known for his assembled clips for the Oscar ceremonies, including In Memoriam segments, doesn't have to do much to enhance the drama in Welles' life because... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: INHERENT VICE, Say Hello To The American Psyche, Circa 1970

Paul Thomas Anderson faithfully adapts Thomas Pynchon's most accessible novel, the zaniest surf noir, Inherent Vice. It is also the first time he's worked with a large ensemble cast since Magnolia. The result is often hilarious, a laborious snapshot of... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: WILD, Featuring A Committed And Captivating Reese Witherspoon

Taking on another true story after his hugely successful Dallas Buyer's Club, director Jean-Marc Vallée this time turns his lens to the story of Cheryl Strayed, a woman with a past who takes it upon herself to hike hundreds of... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Five Flavours 2014 Review: SHADOW DAYS, A Bold Critique Of China's Notorious One-Child Policy

Zhao Dayong's meaningful and compelling drama Shadow Days offers an unflinching commentary on pressing social and cultural issues pertinent to contemporary China. The documentary maker's second foray into fiction, it revolves around an ordinary young couple who move into an... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Morbido Fest 2014 Review: AMERICAN MUSCLE, Smashing, Bloody, Rude, And Often Nude

John Falcon is mad. Imprisoned for 10 years, he's about to be paroled, but his prison sentence hasn't mellowed him one iota. If anything, it's made him a more fierce creature, the personification of fury, refusing to compromise on his... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

SAIFF 2014 Review: DUKHTAR Exposes The Deadly Binds That Tie Together Tribal Pakistan

South Asian cinema has come to the point at which the international community has begun to take closer notice. Films, the vast majority of which hail from India's burgeoning Hindi independent cinema, are appearing on international film festival rosters at... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: LATE PHASES Aims To Be More Than A Werewolf Movie

A friend of mine is fond of applying the phrase "a wolf in sheep's clothing" to genre films. The theory goes that a good genre flick should have a tried and true "A" genre suit of sheep's clothing, and a... More »
By John Jarzemsky   
  

Review: V/H/S VIRAL Delivers Another Mixed Bag Of Horror

V/H/S brought us stories from Ti West, Adam Wingard, Glen McQuaid, and Joe Swanberg, among others. V/H/S 2 gave us far superior films from Gareth Evans and Timo Tjahjanto, Gregg Hale and Eduardo Sanchez, Jason Eisener, Simon Barrett, and Adam... More »
  

Five Flavours 2014 Review: Handsomely Shot 2030 Sinks Under The Weight Of Its Own Ambitions

Second time Vietnamese helmer Nguyen-Vo Nghiem-Minh makes a come back on the international festival circuit with 2030 (Nuoc), a film that conspicuously defies easy categorization by melding elements of a romantic triangle drama, murder mystery, and eco-conscious sci-fi thriller. Originally... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

SAIFF 2014 Review: X - PAST IS PRESENT Is A Look At Love Through 11 Pairs Of Eyes

We've all done it.We've all sat in the ruins of a destroyed relationship and wondered where exactly we went wrong. We've all become flush at the prospect of a new romance and felt our hearts flutter at the endless possibilities... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Third I 2014 Review: MEET THE PATELS Mixes Modern Love And Timeworn Tradition

Ravi Patel is an actor. He's one of those guys. You know, that guy. The guy who plays a doctor or a lawyer on TV, typical Indian American jobs. He's not setting the world on fire, but he makes a... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: BUTTER ON THE LATCH, A Fascinating And Truly Original Work Of Art

One of the most fascinating and fully-formed talents to emerge this year is director, actress, and performance artist Josephine Decker, who now has two accomplished features under her belt. The first, Butter on the Latch, had its world premiere at... More »
  

Review: ROSEWATER, A Disappointing Passion Project By Jon Stewart

It's safe to say that for the last several decades Jon Stewart has been one of the most powerful voices in comedy. Since taking over The Daily Show, his show has been a beacon for popular American political satire, showing... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: BAD TURN WORSE, A Crackling Small Town Thriller

The feature debut from directorial siblings Simon and Zeke Hawkins is a tense and earthy film noir that wears its pulp influences proudly on its sleeve as it weaves a tale of love, betrayal and escape through the underbelly of... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: FOXCATCHER, A Rewarding Look Into A Cold And Strange World

John Eleuthère du Pont, one of the heirs to the vast Du Pont fortune, had it all, it seemed. Wealthy almost beyond measure, he studied and wrote on ornithology and was an avid philatelist, having paid a record (at the... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

St. Louis 2014 Review: THE MAKINGS OF YOU Makes A Noteworthy Debut

Whenever Hollywood comes to St. Louis, Missouri (my hometown) the filmmakers are inevitably bowled over by the architecture, the vibe, and the sheer possibilities the city has to offer in terms of diverse filming locations. In the past few decades,... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: Kurosawa's SEVENTH CODE, More Complex And Thrilling Than It First Appears

Those expecting another genre bending, bone-chilling spectacle from J-horror master helmer Kurosawa Kiyoshi may be a little disappointed with his low-budget, brisk, slow-moving 2013 feature Seventh Code. Without explaining anything, Kurosawa throws the viewer into a story that at... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Book Review: Shawn Levy's DE NIRO: A LIFE Opens Up The Life And Films Of Robert De Niro

For me, a good writer makes you want to re-watch movies you've seen a dozen times. That's what Shawn Levy does with De Niro: A Life (Crown Archetype, 2014, 600 pages), a new biography that digs respectfully into the actor's... More »
By Peter Martin   
  
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