Sundance 2014 Review: MEMPHIS Is A Truly Mesmerizing Meditation On The American South

Dusk. A blue summer day ending on a worn and warm boulevard. The pin prick glow of street lamps dazzle in the distance. A figure lumbers down the block. A hat tipped to one side, he is lost in thought.... More »
  

Review: Godfrey Reggio's VISITORS, A Gorgeous Visual Tone Poem

Koyaanisqatsi (1982), a genre-defining, landmark film that features stunning time-lapse photography and a hypnotic score by Philip Glass, expanded the boundaries of film. It garnered a cult following and spawned countless imitators in the commercial, documentary and narrative film worlds... More »
  

Sundance 2014 Review: In THE SKELETON TWINS Bill Hader Elevates An Otherwise Pedestrian American Dramedy

I've been here before. This all looks quite familiar. It's not quite deja vu though. The window dressing is different. They've swapped a cute dog for goldfish. I think that's a new couch. But that's the same ottoman.Craig Johnson's The... More »
  

Sundance 2014 Review: COOTIES Delivers Bloody Laughs

What happens when the creator of Saw and Insidious teams up with the creator of Glee? Cooties happens, a gleefully bloody crowd pleaser of a horror-comedy weighted more towards the comedy end of the spectrum blessed with a sterling cast... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

DVD Review: OLD GOATS, Still Butting Heads On Life, Love, And Friendship

An antidote to the steady stream of movies about aimless twenty-somethings, Old Goats revolves around a trio of older gentlemen dealing with issues that never go away: the fear of commitment and intimacy, the yearning for an adventurous life, and... More »
  

Sundance 2014 Review: LISTEN UP PHILIP Asks For Sympathy For The Asshole

A few years back Alex Ross Perry caught the eye of many in the American independent scene with his second feature, the delightfully awful (or is that awfully delightful?) The Color Wheel. A sibling road tripper with the penchant for... More »
  

Sundance 2014 Review: Thumbs Up For Roger Ebert Doc LIFE ITSELF

If you do what I do -- cherish film and have the chutzpah to tell other people what you think about them -- then you're almost certainly indebted to Roger Ebert. I've documented at length the effect that he had... More »
  

Sundance 2014 Review: COLD IN JULY Is Dank And Sweaty And Fabulous

Stake Land and We Are What We Are director Jim Mickle exits his customary horror territory and heads for something altogether darker with grimy crime thriller Cold In July. Adapted from the novel by Joe R Lansdale, Cold In July... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Sundance 2014 Review: BOYHOOD Is An Extraordinary Chronicle Of Growing Up In America

12 years off and on in production, and clearly in the works for a lot longer, Richard Linklater's latest is a rare cinematic feat for reasons that go quite beyond its already unorthodox shooting schedule. Call it "This American Boy's... More »
  

Sundance 2014 Review: WAR STORY, A Devastating Study Of Conflict, From Within

Mark Jackson did not so much as burst forth onto the independent film scene in 2011 with his brilliant first feature Without. Rather he made a careful set of imprints and impressions, distinct and measured, over the entire year on... More »
  

Slamdance 2014 Review: SOMETIMES I DREAM I'M FLYING Considers The Form Of Ballet With Grace

I recently told a friend that one of my dreams was to see The Rite Of Spring performed as full-on a ballet. I said that really just thinking of Stravinsky's music -- as most of us probably do -- and... More »
  

Slamdance 2014 Review: LOVE STEAKS Is Bold, Brash And Beautifully Ugly

A flash in the pan. Hands on a middle aged body. Scented oils. Grease. Steaks sizzling. Hips. Thighs. Raw meat. Chakras. Auras. A slab of frozen lamb. The fizz-boom-fizz of industrial music kicking our ears in. The images keep pummeling... More »
  

Slamdance 2014 Review: ELLIOT Will Make You Believe In Canada's First Action Hero

Yes. You read that right. Canada's first action hero. China has Jackie Chan and Jet Li. America has Arnold and Sly. Europe has Jean-Claude Van Damme. And if Elliot Scott has his way, Canada will have... Elliot "White Lightning" Scott.... More »
  

Slamdance 2014 Review: COPENHAGEN, A Heartfelt Ode To The City, To Sorrow, And To Change

William is a twenty-something American traveling in Europe. Except he's Canadian 'cause "that's still a thing right?" He's obnoxious, rude, a veritable asshole, putting anything he's got left (a potent mix of self-loathing, male ego and hormones) into drinking and... More »
  

Slamdance 2014 Review: LITTLE HOPE WAS ARSON Finds Forgivness In Darkness Alight

I've never been one to articulate very well my stance on documentaries as a storytelling medium. Ironic perhaps given my standing here at Twitch, but I can count on own my two hands the number of docs I've reviewed (though... More »
  

Review: MAIDENTRIP Is A Beautiful Celebration Of Youth

You may have already heard this story: A fifteen-year-old girl wins a legal battle versus the Dutch government to stay in the custody of her parents and is therefore able to set out on her 40-foot sailboat in an... More »
  

Review: COLD COMES THE NIGHT Elevates Familiar Genre Elements With Fine Performances And Skillful Execution

In 2009, writer-director Tze Chun garnered much acclaim with his debut feature Children of Invention, a semi-autobiographical film about a single mother and her two children struggling to make ends meet in suburban Boston. At first glance, Chun's follow-up, the... More »
  

Review: THE TRUTH ABOUT EMANUEL Floats To The Surface

The sophomore film by writer/director Francesca Gregorini, following 2009's Tanner Hall, revolves around Emanuel (Kaya Scodelario), a precocious high school girl who carries on her shoulders the self-placed burden of her mother's childbirth death. For Emanuel, life is a struggle... More »
  

Review: BANSHEE CHAPTER, Experimental Drugs Lead To Strange Sounds In The Night

I'm instantly wary of any movie that proclaims its truthfulness right at the top. Why can't I watch it and then decide for myself? Yet Banshee Chapter cleverly steps around the traps it sets for itself with an opening montage... More »
  

Review: Quentin Dupieux's WRONG COPS Are The Right Cops

Wrong Cops is a film you feel in your organs. Like the Oizo beats that make up the soundtrack, it pulses with the life force of humanity's birthplace. Those primal urges that shape the evolution of mankind: the struggle to... More »
  
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