Review: CARTEL LAND, Mexico, Drugs, And The U.S. Battle

An astonishing journalistic achievement, Cartel Land captures in unprecedented ways the moral quagmire that inexorably links the consumers of drugs in the U.S. with the suppliers south of the border. What sets this film apart is the unique way... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: FELT, A United Front Of Creative Forces

There comes a moment early on in Toad Road director Jason Banker's Felt which beautifully sets the tone for what is to unfold over the next 70 or so minutes of his second narrative feature. After partying with a few young... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: ...IN THE DARK, You Have To Face Your Inner Demons

Indie filmmaker David Spaltro's follow up to his award-winning Things I Don't Understand, titled ...In The Dark, is an independently produced horror feature. Like Spaltro's earlier films, this is also set in modern day New York. The story concerns Bethany (Grace Folsom),... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Review: RESULTS, Self-Absorbed To An Alarming, Insightful Degree

Polished and shiny, Andrew Bujalski's Results stands in stark visual contrast to the filmmaker's previous stylistic indulgence, Computer Chess. Shot in murky black and white with a primitive camera, Computer Chess focused on programmers at the dawn of the personal... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: THE OVERNIGHT, Hysterically Saucy And Possibly Shocking

It's so incredibly tempting to reveal all the bizarre places Patrick Brice's new film, The Overnight, takes its audiences, who, if they're anything like this viewer, will likely watch the film with mouths gleefully agape.The film opens in the bedroom... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Review: BURYING THE EX, Of Love, Horror, And Comedy

A triumphant return for a beloved master or a sleepy reworking of now overly familiar tropes in a zombie movement that just won't die? Joe Dante's Burying The Ex is neither, really, the horror comedy showing clearly that the director... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Review: INFINITELY POLAR BEAR Blows Hot And Cold

Proof that fine actors giving strong performances are not always enough to save a movie, Maya Forbes' Infinitely Polar Bear seems too preoccupied with its 70s period setting and zany family antics to pay more than vague lip service to... More »
By James Marsh   
  

LA Film Fest Review: I AM THALENTE, Skating On Passion, Finding Purpose

We all know the sound. That clack-scrape-whoosh of a skateboard on the sidewalk. For many of us it is as close to the sport as we get. When we hear that sound some of us move out of the way... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Blu-ray Review: THE STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEKYLL AND MISS OSBOURNE, A Twisted Tale Of Sex And Violence

Hot on the heels of Arrow Video's incredible (and incredibly sold out) Walerian Borowczyk Box set from last autumn, the company has dug deeper into the director's idiosyncratic oeuvre to deliver what is likely his most straight ahead horror feature,... More »
By Charlie Hobbs   
  

Review: THE WOLFPACK, A Coming Of Age Story Like No Other

I've heard about many great eccentric, downright crazy family stories that have taken place in New York's Lower East Side (LES) through friends over the years. But none was as batshit crazy as the story of The Wolfpack. The documentary... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL Earns Every Emotional Beat

The title for Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is kind of appalling, a sing-song rhyming cadence that reminds of Lobo's buttery 1971 pop hit "Me And You and a Dog Named Boo". Its premise -- a young... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Blu-ray Review: CANNIBAL FEROX, A Vile And Repulsive Film With A Stunning Home Video Release

Let me just get this out there: I hate Cannibal Ferox. I want potential readers to understand the place from which I am coming before you decide whether or not to pay my opinion any mind. Cannibal Ferox is a... More »
By Charlie Hobbs   
  

Blu-ray Review: Arrow Video's SOCIETY Is A Showstopper

Before Society, Brian Yuzna was known mostly, if at all, as the producer of Stuart Gordon's iconic Re-Animator. Yuzna initially had no interest in directing, his initial interest was in being the big shot, and to him that meant producing.... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: WE ARE STILL HERE, An Authentic, Jolting Horror Thriller

The quiet before the storm is unsettling. It's a beautiful winter day in 1979. Anne (Barbara Crampton) and Paul (Andrew Sensenig) are driving to their new life in a new home in New England. Paul drives, calmly, while Anne emotes,... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: DOOMSDAYS, A Pre-Apocalypse Travelogue Of Dark Wit

In the superbly static opening shot of Eddie Mullins' Doomsdays, we find two young men making a quick escape from a low window of a handsome Upstate New York home as the real owners walk in the front door, unaware... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: DEEP WEB, Where David And Goliath Battle For Privacy

The 21st century is a foreign country. If you had asked someone in 1989 what the charming fantasy adventure The Princess Bride, and slacker time travel history lesson, Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure had in common, you would likely have gotten a... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: Struck By Lightning. Bitten By A Cobra. KUNG FURY Is A Giddy Blast Of B-Movie Entertainment.

Ladies and gentlemen, I could write quite a lot here about how the internet has democratized filmmaking and storytelling, and how that has had impacts both good and bad. I could cite statistics about crowd funding, viewership patterns and the... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Review: UNCERTAIN TERMS, Between Romance And Delusion

We are walking down a serene wooded path. With our back to us is a redheaded girl, her hair in a long, tight braid, her shoulders slumped forward. She's walking through the woods, pondering her very existence: Why is she... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: KRISHA Introduces An Exciting New Director In The Home Movie From Hell

Jean-Luc Godard once said that all you need for a movie is a gun and a girl. With Krisha, a rich psychological thriller about family secrets, mental-breakdown and addiction, director Trey Edward Shults proves that one can make compelling... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: CAROL, Tremendously Accomplished, Yet Cold

Todd Haynes' Carol is an objectively beautiful film. It is exquisitely acted, hauntingly shot and meticulously well-designed. And it left me surprisingly cold. The same-sex melodrama presents an interesting case where form and content match up a little too well.... More »
By Ben Croll   
  
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