LA Film Fest 2014 Review: UNCERTAIN TERMS, Between Romance And Delusion

We are walking down a serene wooded path. With our back to us is a redheaded girl, her hair in a long, tight braid, her shoulders slumped forward. She's walking through the woods as if she's pondering her very existence;... More »
  

Review: WOLFCOP, The Hairy But Tangled Canadian Horror Comedy

So now that western Canada has had its fill of Lowell Dean's horror comedy Wolfcop (if you think you missed it do not worry for it has been carried over) those of us in eastern Canada find ourselves in the... More »
  

Review: THE SIGNAL Goes Everywhere, Mysteriously

A dreamy atmosphere is established early in William Eubank's sophomore feature The Signal, holding the promise that the story could go, literally, anywhere. It's a haunting, lonely, moody, deliberately-paced atmosphere that's reminiscent of Eubank's debut, Love, which was set aboard... More »
  

Review: THE SACRAMENT Is Delicious Kool-Aid For Thirsty Viewers

Sometimes we are frankly limited by our terminology. What do you call a film that uses in-world video? That is to say, what do you call a film where the camera used to exclusively record the footage is incorporated as... More »
  

Review: NIGHT MOVES, A Tense Showcase Of Guilt And Paranoia

When purchasing a used boat for an act of extreme vandalism, a young activist quips that she chose the one named "Night Moves" because it was better in her mind than "Sea Breeze" or "Heart's Ease." I tend to pay... More »
  

Cannes 2014 Review: WHITE GOD Unleashes The Hounds Of Allegory

Doggedly heavy on allegory, the film by Hungarian director Kornél Mundruczó's White God (Fehér Isten) has a relatively simple premise - beware the comeuppance for those that treat badly those they believe to be inferior.At its heart, the film plays... More »
  

Review: COLD IN JULY, Dank And Sweaty And Fabulous

Stake Land and We Are What We Are director Jim Mickle exits his customary horror territory and heads for something altogether darker with grimy crime thriller Cold In July. Adapted from the novel by Joe R Lansdale, Cold In July... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Review: WORDS AND PICTURES, A Rivalry In Search Of A Romance

In my youth, a cigarette company advertised their product with the tagline, "What do you want, good grammar or good taste?" It was a false analogy, of course -- the correct answer is, "Why can't I have both?" -- yet... More »
  

NYIFF 2014 Review: In SNIFFER A Man Finds Himself In The Dirty Laundry Of Others

Most people show a lot of who they are through their interactions with others. Sure, there's the person we think we are, or the person that we imagine ourselves to be on our best days, but it's really how we... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Cannes 2014 Review: IT FOLLOWS, A Somber, Effective And Assured Thriller

With a terrific cold opening, a somber and effective mood, strong performances and assured direction, there's lots to love about It Follows. It's a kind of pure thriller, with a few shocks mixed into what's a remarkably consistent vision that... More »
  

Review: SX_TAPE? More Like SUX_Tape. Amirite? High Five!

Can I just say something? SX_Tape is an awful, awful film. In the interest of appeasing the editorial gods, I will elaborate, however, I feel as though I'm getting dumber just for having to spend precious moments of my life... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Fantaspoa 2014 Review: DEVIL IN MY RIDE, An Amusing Road/Buddy/Exorcism Movie

If The Battery approached the zombie movie with a very low budget but lots of fun and ingenuity, Devil in My Ride tries to do the same with the exorcism film. Gary Michael Schultz's first feature-length effort centers on more... More »
  

Review: THE IMMIGRANT, Coming To America Is Gorgeous, But Slow Business

While heralded by a dedicated group of cinephiles in the U.S. (as well as most critics in France), director James Gray has always been more talked-about for his sure hand with actors and drama than for his visual style. Not... More »
  

Review: Dutch Skate-boarding Doc ZOMBIE: THE RESURRECTION OF TIM ZOM Grinds Deeper Than The Surface

(Dude, who scratched my car?) In the past, the International Film Festival Rotterdam was sometimes chided for not having much locally-made content in its program, being maybe a bit TOO international for its own good. Recent editions have remedied that... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: STAGE FRIGHT Sings, Dances, And Slashes Its Way Into Hearts

In the fall of 2010, everyone at Fantastic Fest was talking about The Legend of Beaver Dam, a short film that looked like a spooky horror flick until it burst into a musical. The short captured the disparate moods required... More »
  

Review: CHEF Cooks Up Profound Retrospect

I've been waiting 15 years to give Jon Favreau the glowing review he's earned in spades with his return-to-roots film Chef. He has no doubt had a very interesting career since his initial indie splash Swingers back in 1996, but... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Imagine 2014 Review: THE POOL Provides Dutch Horror With Intelligence And Depth

(Why the hell do people go camping in the wild anyway?) In the Dutch horror thriller The Pool, two families go camping. To try and find a quiet secluded spot, they illegally break into a nature reserve, and after some... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Newport Beach 2014 Review: THIS LAST LONELY PLACE, A Fine Tuned, Pitch Dark Noir

Picture it: The gun in the lap of a beautiful dame. A once powerful man hounded by the shadows of his triumphs. The cabbie with a kind heart and worn eyes. A fresh start. That last trick. The final score.... More »
  

Tribeca 2014 Review: LAND HO! Takes Us On An Immensely Charming Icelandic Road Trip

The wonderfully freewheeling, peripatetic road movie Land Ho!, spanning the vast, rich Icelandic landscape, marks the first collaboration between two talented independent filmmakers: Martha Stephens (Passenger Pigeons, Pilgrim Song) and Aaron Katz (Dance Party USA, Quiet City, Cold Weather). Together, they... More »
  

Review: BLUE RUIN, Or, Revenge Is A Pain In The Ass

Besides the fact that I doubt we'll see a more deft, thrilling genre film this year, I'm very pleased that Jeremy Saulnier's Blue Ruin addresses a number of issues that revenge films have been overlooking for decades. For example, after... More »
  
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