Toronto 2015 Review: Short Doc WORLD FAMOUS GOPHER HOLE MUSEUM Offers A Beautiful, Bizarre And Tragic Slice Of Life

Though it runs only twenty minutes, Chelsea McMullan and Douglas Nayler's World Famous Gopher Hole Museum makes an over sized impression. Finding a deeply human soul in its even more deeply quirky subject matter, all of it presented flawlessly in... More »
By Todd Brown   

Toronto 2015 Review: BLACK Paints A Vivid Picture Of The Violent, Seedy Side Of Brussels

When you're hanging with a posse who murder, steal, rape and share the bed with the same women and commit every crime imaginable, it's time to reassess your life.  Black is a movie you will not forget once you see... More »
By Chase Whale   

Toronto 2015 Review: ROOM, A Character Study Wrapped In A Thriller

At their best, films can literally change our perspective. We can be put into the position, visually and psychologically, of the characters on screen. With montage we see through their eyes, with dialogue we get into their souls. It's... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Review: BLIND, A Stunning, Sensitive Ode To The Lonely

What we see: A street in Oslo, Norway. A dress shop. Pedestrians stream on by. Standing inside of the shop is a German Shepard. It Barks. Spittle hits the window. Pedestrians stream on by. What we hear: A woman's voice,... More »
By Ben Umstead   

NecronomiCon Providence 2015 Review: INNSMOUTH Is Short But Shocking

This year, it's 125 years ago that H. P. Lovecraft was born, and though the writer died in 1937, his influence and popularity have not diminished one bit over the last few decades. Literally suffering from a Fantastic Fear of... More »
By Ard Vijn   

FrightFest 2015 Review: A FAVOR Engenders Favour

One of our own, the incorrigibly wicked Izzy Lee, is back with another macabrely mirthsome short film - A Favor - which just screened at no less a "dark heart of cinema" than FrightFest. Though I have only seen Lee's most... More »
By Stuart Muller   

Sidewalk Film Fest 2015 Review: THREE FINGERS, A Powerful Engagement With Trauma

While the average person in the United States might be familiar with the illness known as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its prevalence among war veterans, it is arguably an 'invisible' illness (unlike the loss of a limb, for example)... More »

Review: Z FOR ZACHARIAH, A Gem Of A Film

The premise is beautiful in its elegant simplicity - a woman is left alone in a world that has befallen a catastrophe. Her solitude is interrupted when a man appears, unsettling her life and making radical changes to her situation.... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Review: QUEEN OF EARTH, Another Promising Effort By A Fearless Director

Alex Ross Perry is a more than promising young director. He courageously combines intimacy, humor and a sense for cinematic language and form. Nevertheless, his latest, Queen of Earth, is a step back for the young director in terms of maturity... More »

Review: STATION TO STATION, In A Realm Of Its Own

It consists of countless bands, playing on and off a polychromatic train as it passes through innumerable cities. But Station To Station is no rockumentary. That it often features brilliant bands playing live on a train will perhaps evoke, for some, the choo... More »
By Zach Gayne   

Review: 6 YEARS Succeeds Wildly In Exploring A Precarious Relationship

Young love can be so damn difficult. This is the fertile soil tilled in Hannah Fidell's 6 Years, the follow-up to her critically acclaimed debut feature A Teacher. As in that film, Fidell employs a distinctly naturalistic filmmaking style to... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   

Review: BIG SKY, A Modest, Quiet Survival Drama

Like many sophomore features, Jorge Michel Grau's Big Sky suffers a bit by comparison with what came before. That's especially so because Grau debuted with the immensely impressive Somos lo que hay (We Are What We Are), an atmospheric character... More »
By Peter Martin   

Review: MISTRESS AMERICA, Easy, Breezy Comedy With A Point

After falling into a depressing, dour pit with 2010's Greenberg, director Noah Baumbach rebounded with the far more lighthearted and sprightly Frances Ha, which he co-wrote with Greta Gerwig. Their collaboration continued on a successful note with last year's While... More »
By Peter Martin   

Review: ONE & TWO, Emotionally Rich And Surprisingly Mystical

Isolation can be a killer. For the children who are the heart and soul of One and Two, that's especially so, given that they have been raised in isolation, surrounded by a giant wall. Eva (Kiernan Shipka, Mad Men) and... More »
By Peter Martin   

Review: PEOPLE, PLACES, THINGS, A Lovely, Comforting Film

People, Places, Things is a dry, almost forgettable title that refers to a film much better than those adjectives strung together by commas. It's a quotidian moniker for a film that's kind of exceptional, celebrated not only because of its... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Review: AMNESIAC, Michael Polish's Refreshing Take On A Hostage Thriller

Twin filmmakers Michael and Mark Polish occupy a special spot in the American indie landscape. Since their strong debut Twin Falls Idaho, a weird little movie about conjoined twins, the brothers have been chugging along surviving in Hollywood, acting and... More »
By Dustin Chang   

Fantasia 2015 Review: NINA FOREVER Is A Threesome With Sex, Love And Death.

I had a university professor (English literature) who was fond of saying, "Nobody walks away happy from a threeway." I wonder what he would have to say about the Blaine Brothers' Nina Forever, a dark but droll relationship drama that... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   

Review: CALL ME LUCKY, Hilarious, Moving, And Deeply Affecting

I admit that when I first saw Bobcat Goldthwait on screen sometime in the 1980s, he of the Grover voice making me laugh in the second Police Academy movie, it never occurred to me that he'd be helming one... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Review: COP CAR, A Damn Awesome Movie

Sometimes a film's premise just sells itself. Two mischievous boys stumble upon an abandoned cop car and decide to take it for a joyride. It turns out the cop car belongs to an officer on the wrong side of the... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   

Fantasia 2015 Review: Time Travel Is A Bastard In SYNCHRONICITY

I never thought it would happen, but I have finally, personally, hit the wall with indie time travel flicks. Jacob Gentry's Synchronicity is not lacking in smarts or clockwork precision, but abjectly fails to convince in its core ideas of love... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
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