Slamdance 2016 Review: MAD Finds The Humor In Sadness

Robert G. Putka has built up a smart and sharp filmography of shorts over the last half decade, emphasizing rich, rude and raw performances, deriving his drama and comedy with character first. MAD, his feature debut, is as charming as... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: MARTYRS, A Worthless American Remake

Pascal Laugier's Martyrs is one of the most genuinely disturbing films of the last decade, a peculiar mix of genres from revenge thriller to torture porn that shocks equally for its graphic content and main concept. The inevitable American remake, helmed... More »
  

Sundance 2016 Review: NORMAN LEAR: JUST ANOTHER VERSION OF YOU, No Better Tribute

Few people have changed popular culture more than Norman Lear. When Television was at its height he provided a much needed jolt, giving audiences not what they asked for but what they required. His comedies were dramatic, crafting more... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: SYNCHRONICITY, Time Travel Is A Bastard

I never thought it would happen, but I have finally, personally, hit the wall with indie time travel flicks. Jacob Gentry's Synchronicity is not lacking in smarts or clockwork precision, but abjectly fails to convince in its core ideas of love... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: TERMINUS Shoots For the Stars, Crashes

Directed and co-written by Marc Furmie, Terminus tells what happens when an alien pod or meteorite fragment falls to Earth. The story focuses on garage owner and mechanic David Chamberlain (Jai Koutrae) and his daughter Annabelle (Kendra Appleton) as they struggle... More »
  

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Keeps BURROUGHS: THE MOVIE Alive

For NYU grad student Jim Jarmusch, being consistently presented with scenes like Patti Smith dancing on the tables of Max's Kansas City, while the band Television helmed the stage, was all part of the New York landscape. Meanwhile, his best friend... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Review: MOOR, A Story Of Broken Tracks, Broken Lives, And Building Hope

It seems as though no matter where you look in Pakistan these days, the spectre of British imperial rule looms over the nation in ways that are perhaps so deeply ingrained in the fabric of the nation that's it... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: DIABLO, A Western That Makes Its Genre Generic

The Western film genre, a main staple of American movies decades ago, but nowadays much scarcer, is currently enjoying a mini-revival, spearheaded by the current 70mm roadshow release of Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight, in which Tarantino continues to marry... More »
  

Review: YOSEMITE, Childhood Is Always Now

What is it about childhood that makes us adults so wary of who we once were? Perhaps it is that great fear of the unknown; a shadow, a whisper of adulthood, that as children scares us into submission of these... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: ANOMALISA, A Real, Honest And Meaningful Gift

When the philosopher says, "Hell is other people," he perhaps means that in trying to figure ourselves out, we are beholden to our reflections and interactions with other people. Or maybe he is talking about the modern customer service experience. In... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: ANGUISH, Horrifying And Heartbreaking

Sonny Mallhi's directorial debut Anguish opens with Lucinda and her mom driving home. The conversation is strained, as conversations with budding teenagers tend to be. Shockingly, it is a conversation that comes to a tragic and sudden end. We then join... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Review: HEART OF A DOG Will Work Its Way Into Yours

Laurie Anderson isn't a filmmaker. But, you'd never know it. Sure, she's made a film or two over the years, but really, she hails from the fine art world, where she's enjoyed considerable success as a performer and musician. Now, Anderson... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: STINKING HEAVEN, Everything Rotten Is Good

We all live by rules. Whether they are personal choices to undertake or those put upon us by work or family, we live by them. But sometimes those rules can destroy us.Nathan Silver's fifth feature, Stinking Heaven, takes place in... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Blu-ray Review: Stephen Norrington's DEATH MACHINE, An Uncut Blast Of 90's Cyperpunk Horror

The '90s were a terrible era for a lot of things. Popular music? Check. Awful fashion? Double check. Horror movies? Well, let's look at one of those...Death Machine is the brainchild of Stephen Norrington. Norrington would later go on to... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: CHI-RAQ Aims To Put Gun Violence To Bed

Spike Lee is making some noise, and he wants to make absolutely sure that you hear it. After a solid decade, or longer, of slowly sliding into a plane of cultural irrelevance that the outspoken filmmaker is simply not suited... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: HITCHCOCK/TRUFFAUT Is A Cinephile's Wet Dream

We all know that everything has a meaning in a Hitchcock film - gesture, pose, framing, inanimate objects, camera movements, architecture, everything. It's layers upon layers of these cinematic elements that make his films stand the test of time.... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Blu-ray Review: Finally, THE APU TRILOGY Receives The Attention It Deserves

I've been writing about Indian cinema for a little over five years now. I've been a fan of Indian cinema for right around ten years. Yet, until a couple of weeks ago, I had never seen any of the films... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: GHOST MOUNTAINEER, The Scariest Stories Are True

Growing up in Canada, you develop a healthy respect for the cold, when you could die just from being caught outside, not to mention activities that could have you buried under snow, or trapped in places with no civilization for... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: MA, A Mesmerizing Study In Movement And Myth

Celia Rowlson-Hall studied choreography and dance, but has turned her considerable talents in those areas to film and video, and her first feature-length film Ma is a experimental wonder, a strange retelling of the Virgin Mary, which becomes a pilgrimage... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: THE BRIDE, Love In The Ruins

Federico García Lorca's play Blood Wedding has been popular for over 80 years, for its level of drama akin to Greek tragedy, blood feuds between families, and one woman caught between two men she loves. In The Bride, Paula Ortiz... More »
  
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