Review: HOT TUB TIME MACHINE 2 Is #2 In More Ways Than One

It would be wrong to call Hot Tub Time Machine 2 an ugly, smug, hateful waste of cinema, because to do so would imply that it indeed exhibits at least a flair for the cinematic. Which, of course, is not... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Now Streaming: BOSCH, When Minor Keys Strike Major Chords

Harry Bosch is a collision waiting to happen. As essayed by Titus Welliver in the first 10 episodes of Bosch, a new series that debuted in its entirety on Amazon.com over the weekend, the titular character is a Los Angeles... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: KINGSMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE Tastes Pretty Yummy

The world of espionage has become a bit dour of late. Our postmodern proclivities have caught up with us, and thanks to our impossible missions, our Bourne fascinations and a Daniel Craig-ified Bond, we've lost a little bit of the... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, Not That Terrible

Not wanting to be a snob, I attempted to read Fifty Shades of Grey, the bestseller inspired by the Twilight books (which I also haven't read). It's quite badly written, but hey, it was popular, so maybe I was missing... More »
  

Twitchvision: Jason Gorber Talks STILL ALICE And JUPITER ASCENDING

Back in studio this week, featuring a look at the latest film from the Wachowski siblings, Jupiter Ascending, along with the Julianne Moore-starring, Academy Award shoe-in Still Alice.Video embedded below... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: SEVENTH SON Should Satisfy The Biggest Fantasy Fans

Based on Joseph Delaney's The Wardstone Chronicles -- more specifically on the saga's first volume, The Spook's Apprentice -- Seventh Son tells the story of Thomas (Ben Barnes), a young farmer chosen to be the new apprentice of Master Gregory... More »
  

Review: JUPITER ASCENDING, A Thrilling Yet Contrived Space Opera

Originally set for June 2014, the Wachowskis' new blockbuster was eventually postponed to February 2015 with a diminished, low marketing campaign. Everything seems to indicate that Warner Bros don't believe in the film anymore, despite their massive investment. Yet, Jupiter... More »
  

Review: Kevin Costner's BLACK OR WHITE Is Anything But

Dances with Wolves. Field of Dreams. JFK. And now, Black or White. That's how Kevin Costner, who not only stars in, but financed this highly approachable light drama about contemporary race relations, is pitching the film. In his varied and overall... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: PROJECT ALMANAC, A Cautionary Time-Travel Thriller For Teens

Something funny happened on the way to delivering a found-footage time-travel movie for teenagers: it grew a heart and developed a conscience. Project Almanac (formerly titled Welcome to Yesterday) features science nerds, unrequited crushes, and an extended concert sequence. All... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE Is Flocking Marvelous

Aardman Studios return to the big screen in cracking form with another rip-roaring roller coaster of action, smart humour and lovable characters. Shaun The Sheep Movie promises to delight fans of all ages, and long-time aficionados of the studio's signature... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: BLACKHAT, Michael Mann's Moronic Cyber Scavenger Hunt

Humanity's fascination with the microchip started long before they became everyday necessities for the first world population. You see, we humans have always taken strides for some semblance of consistency and structure through networks and grids. Design and architecture in the... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: KINGSMAN - THE SECRET SERVICE Delivers An Entertaining Ride

The world of espionage has become a bit dour of late. Our postmodern proclivities have caught up with us, and thanks to our impossible missions, our Bourne fascinations and a Daniel Craig-ified Bond, we've lost a little bit of... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: TAKEN 3, Action Cinema For Teenage Softies

Liam Neeson's third outing as over-protective family man Bryan Mills sees him on the run for murder after his ex-wife (Famke Janssen) turns up dead in his apartment. Forest Whitaker heads the investigation, which soon enough uncovers the involvement of... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: A MOST VIOLENT YEAR Slow-Burns With Quality

Lurking modestly in the fringes of film awards season, we have this: an accomplished, dignified, slow-burn of a film. A Most Violent Year is a crime film, a crumbling family drama, an unexpected character study, and an art house pot-boiler.... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: THE GAMBLER, Addiction? What Addiction?

Mark Wahlberg cries in the very first moment of The Gambler, immediately distinguishing his character from the one played by James Caan in the 1974 original. (His name is different too. ) Jim Bennett says goodbye to his dying grandfather... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: AMERICAN SNIPER Aims At The Bullseye, Misses Entirely

Director Clint Eastwood aims for stoic, heroic grandeur in American Sniper, an adaptation of a bestselling book about Chris Kyle, subtitled "The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History." Eastwood's film, however, misses the target entirely for... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: UNBROKEN Takes The Human Spirit To War, Prison

With Unbroken, Angelina Jolie has once again thwarted many expectations of her own career. She's stepped behind the camera to direct what is not just the most un-ironic "triumph of the human spirit" God/country/apple pie film in a long time,... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: INTO THE WOODS Ventures Into A Musically Dark Thicket

"Beware the tale you tell Children will listen"  Just what is Disney up to with Into the Woods? Widely cited as "nobody's favorite Sondheim", this Tim Burton-esque adaptation of the 1987 Broadway stage musical is sing-songy, yes, but it's also intensely... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: SELMA Is Far More Than Just A Martin Luther King Movie

Ava DuVernay's Selma packs a powerful punch, yet its impact is delivered with such finesse and grace that it might seem at first less impressive than it really is, its affects felt much later after you walk away from... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: SEVENTH SON, Generic And Self-Serious Fantasy Fare

A bad spell seems to have been cast on Seventh Son. Sergei Bodrov's first American feature - to whom we owe the impressive 2007's Mongol - saw its release indefinitely delayed. Originally slated to hit US theaters on February 2013,... More »
  
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