Matthew Lee
Derby, England

Matthew was press-ganged into service for Twitch around 2009, just so he'd stop posting long, rambling reviews on the forums for obscure Chinese arthouse movies and cult anime none of the other writers had ever seen. Over the years he's branched out to multiple genres of film from almost every corner of the world, whether in festivals around the North of England and across Europe or on DVD and BluRay. He also contributes feature articles and reviews to the gaming website BeefJack, and writes fiction in his spare time.

ARRIETTY UK DVD & BluRay review

It has to be said, after watching Arrietty - Studio Ghibli's latest animated feature, based on Mary Norton's classic The Borrowers - that the original novel seems so tailor-made for this particular adaptation it's hard to believe no-one ever thought... More »
  

WHISPER OF THE HEART UK BluRay review

Yoshifumi Kondō's Whisper of the Heart is undeniably a magical film, despite there being maybe ten minutes of anything fantastical on screen throughout the entire running time (none of which is actually happening). For all the otherworldly places Studio Ghibli... More »
  

LIFF 2011: THE DIVIDE review

Xavier Gens' superb The Divide basically posits that should the bombs drop and the world get blown to radioactive splinters, the scariest thing that could happen wouldn't be finding out you were screwed. It'd be finding out that given the... More »
  

LIFF 2011: THE WHISPERER IN DARKNESS review

The Whisperer in Darkness is a fan film through and through - an enthusiastic celebration of a subject a core group of believers think is just awesome (classic, literary-minded horror fiction from one of the fathers of the genre). It's... More »
  

LIFF 2011: MARIANNE review

Filip Tegstedt's Marianne stretches the definition of a horror movie by quite some way; there's only one recurring supernatural element and it's left very much open to interpretation as to whether the main character is imagining the whole thing, to... More »
  

LIFF 2011: MASKS review

So Andreas Marschall really likes his giallo? Masks, the director's second film, is so breathlessly earnest it could be a YouTube viral hit blown up to feature length. Virtually every scene is a hymn to lurid Italian psychodramas where a... More »
  

The Northlander: talking to MARIANNE director Filip Tegstedt

Filp Tegstedt's Marianne stood out among some pretty impressive genre productions at the Leeds Film Festival 2011 given the Swedish director's debut almost doesn't feel like a conventional horror film at all. The story of a man eaten alive by... More »
  

LIFF 2011: JUAN OF THE DEAD review

At first glance Alejandro Brugués's zombie comedy Juan of the Dead doesn't sound too promising. Unless you're a devoted follower of the diverse strands of Latin American cinema the idea of an unknown director shooting an affectionate tribute to Edgar... More »
  

LIFF 2011: EXIT HUMANITY review

There are some ideas it's hard to see how people could possibly screw up. Take horror (as in the supernatural) in the middle of a war zone. You've got potentially limitless subtext, the nightmares soldiers and civilians go through literally... More »
  

LIFF 2011: BELLFLOWER review

It's great when a director identifies with a film they've poured heart and soul into making, even more so when it's clearly pushed them to excel. Still, what are you supposed to think when it's a story about weak, contemptible... More »
  

LIFF 2011: FINISTERRAE review

Sometimes, with films, 'individual' means 'too bloody weird for its own good'; less distinguished or distinctive, and more so wrapped up in its own cleverness only the person who dreamt it up can properly appreciate the thing. Finisterrae is a... More »
  

LIFF 2011: SHE MONKEYS review

The problem with Swedish teen drama She Monkeys is there are two approaches artistic filmmakers seem to gravitate towards when they want to explore the subject of young and/or inexperienced people finding out about sex. Either they go gritty, intimate,... More »
  

LIFF 2011: BREATHING review

A young man desperately in need of a purpose ends up taking a job dealing with the recently deceased, collecting the dead and making them look the best they can for their final journey - in the course of which... More »
  

LIFF 2011: AITA review

There've been any number of films where you hear a building is one of the main characters - usually horror - The Shining, the Amityville films - but it's typically a selling point more than anything else. José María de... More »
  

LIFF 2011: LOVE (1972) review

If you judge a film by how well it balances its ups and downs, Karoly Makk's brilliant Love is a master high wire act, a scintillating piece of drama that's warm and compassionate but realistic with it - yet that... More »
  

LIFF 2011: THE GHOST CAT AND THE MYSTERIOUS SHAMISEN (1938) review

Sometimes it's fun to watch an older film and tease out an early example of such-and-such a visual or narrative trope, whether it's to get a sense of how far we've come or to admire how far a particular director... More »
  

Grimm Up North 2011: THE WICKER TREE review

If you're going to mash up horror and comedy ideally your writer or director needs to have it straight what it is the audience are supposed to be laughing at. The idea of a quiet English village hiding a pathologically... More »
  

Grimm Up North 2011: THE THEATRE BIZARRE review

Horror's pretty dumb, right, when you get down to it? Subjecting ourselves to seedy vicarious thrills when if we took pleasure in the same things in real life we'd be clinically insane. Lots of people level this argument against genre... More »
  

'Tis the season: the 25th Leeds International Film Festival gets underway

It's almost time! It's almost time! Gather round - no, not Halloween. That's, like, so October 31st. November 3rd sees the opening night of the 25th Leeds International Film Festival, one of the biggest cinematic events in the UK. There's... More »
  

Ôshima on UK BluRay: MERRY CHRISTMAS, MR. LAWRENCE (1983) review

For a film adapted from a semi-autobiographical novel by a writer who lived an incredibly storied life - and adapted by a near thirty-year veteran director, at that - Nagisa Oshima's famous Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence doesn't seem to reflect... More »
  
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