Matthew Lee
Derby, England

Matthew was press-ganged into service for Twitch around 2009, just so he'd stop posting long, rambling reviews on the forums for obscure Chinese arthouse movies and cult anime none of the other writers had ever seen. Over the years he's branched out to multiple genres of film from almost every corner of the world, whether in festivals around the North of England and across Europe or on DVD and BluRay. He also contributes feature articles and reviews to the gaming website BeefJack, and writes fiction in his spare time.

DVD Review: OEDIPUS REX (1967)

Freud was right about Oedipus. Perhaps the famous neurologist was just some crazy Austrian guy who did altogether too much cocaine, but he was right to say the ancient Greek myth contains a universal truth, if maybe not the one... More »
  

A Trailer For Monster Pictures UK DVD Compilation ULTIMATE ZOMBIE FEAST

Those of you who like the walking dead (in general, not just the comic) and simply cannot have too much of a good thing might want to check out Ultimate Zombie Feast, a forthcoming compilation from the good people at... More »
  

Books to be Scene: Ekaterina Sedia's THE ALCHEMY OF STONE

"Her blue eyes bulge a little from their sockets, taking us in. Her frame clicks as she leans forward, curious about us. Her dress is low-cut, and we see that there is a small transparent window in her chest, where... More »
  

DVD Review: THE ASSAULT

On my mark: slow motion! Mute the volume! Blue filters, go, go, go! Julien Leclerq wants to make sure you know hostage crisis docudrama The Assault is serious business, to the point he deploys every trick in his arsenal inside... More »
  

UK Film Festivals: CELLULOID SCREAMS 2012 First Titles!

UK Twitch readers! Here's another plucky up-and-coming film festival touting a lineup of shock and gore, both prime cuts and nicely aged classics. What, is it Christmas already? Celluloid Screams in Sheffield have recently announced the first wave of their... More »
  

UK Film Festivals: GRIMM UP NORTH 2012 First Titles And Early Bird Passes!

Attention UK Twitch readers who like their cinema grim, disgusting and profane: the very wonderful Manchester horror film festival Grimm Up North is back for another year of the best and brightest movies from the darkest corners of the globe.... More »
  

Books to be Scene: Simon Lelic's RUPTURE

"The teachers would have been standing by now, fixated and immobile, like theatre-goers trapped in the circle as chaos consumes the stalls. They would have seen him fire for a third time and they would have seen the third child... More »
  

Review: THE HARSH LIGHT OF DAY

On the one hand, we're going to have to be cruel here. There are first-time directors who rocket straight to the top of the heap with the skills of someone twice their age... and then there's the rest of them.... More »
  

Review: DARK OF WINTER

David C. Snyder's micro-budget piece of nihilism Dark of Winter is the kind of thing where you feel you can practically see the movie as the director had it set out in his head, along with all the discrepancies between... More »
  

Bradford 2012 Review: WRINKLES

Ignacio Ferreras's Wrinkles means well. It does. But for a film about the joys and sorrows of advanced old age, if Wrinkles were a person it'd be less the elderly hero and more his young relatives patiently talking through him... More »
  

Bradford 2012 Review: THE RAID: REDEMPTION

Another year, another film promising to rejuvenate martial arts cinema - Gareth Huw Evans's sophomore feature The Raid comes riding a tidal wave of hype to that effect, in fact, promising ass-kicking the likes of which you've never seen. Once... More »
  

Bradford 2012 Review: THE LORD'S RIDE

Jean-Charles Hue's The Lord's Ride doesn't lack for ambition. It wants us to feel part of a niche culture which society at large tends to view as outsiders, invisibles, a bit weird, and on top of that it wants us... More »
  

Bradford 2012 Review: MOSCOW DIARY

Adam Kossoff's Moscow Diary does most things a good documentary should. We get a complex, intellectually fascinating subject (a famous writer's trip to Russia in the 1920s, and his thoughts on the nascent Communist party) presented as objectively as circumstances... More »
  

Bradford 2012 Review: ANGELS OF PORT-BOU

Vladimir Léon's cheerful Angels of Portbou is basically an intellectual romantic comedy stripped down to the meet-cute and not much else, and while it's a charming, sometimes genuinely magical little story, at forty-five minutes it's too slight to leave much... More »
  

Bradford 2012 Review: LIVID

Julian Maury and Alexandre Bustillo achieved worldwide recognition for the macabre Inside (2007), one of the films that sparked off a wave of ultraviolent horror from the continent, alongside outrageous talking points like Alexandre Aja's Haute Tension (2003) or Pascal... More »
  

Bradford 2012 review: THE DEVIL'S BUSINESS

So many horror films never bother trying to capture the banality of evil that it's a pleasant surprise (relatively speaking) to find the most terrifying thing about Sean Hogan's The Devil's Business is a simple conversation with a man in... More »
  

Bradford 2012 review: THE INNKEEPERS

Why do so many characters in horror movies end up dooming themselves through their stubborn refusal to take what's going on at face value? To be fair, we all say we'd do things differently but it's a hard thing to... More »
  

Bradford 2012 review: THE REPTILE (1966)

John Gilling's The Reptile seems a prosaic enough Hammer Horror production on paper. A toothsome, venomous horror stalks a remote Cornish village, preying on anyone who wanders up to the manse late at night or takes a wrong turn on... More »
  

DVD Review: The Flamenco Trilogy, EL AMOR BRUJO (1986)

Cross-breeding cinema with the theatre is a tricky business. On the one hand, you've got a medium where you're encouraged to make-believe it's real, while on the other you've got one where the people who work there have to keep... More »
  

DVD Review: The Flamenco Trilogy, CARMEN (1983)

Watching Carlos Saura's Carmen (1983) nearly thirty years after it was originally released is not unlike listening to a scratchy old recording of a favourite song, where every click, pop and flutter boots you out of the zone and reminds... More »
  
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