Christopher Bourne
New York City, New York

Chris is a film critic, editor, blogger, incurable cinephile, and all-around culture maven. He blogs on film at The Bourne Cinema Conspiracy.

Review: STALINGRAD Offers Massive Visual Spectacle But Little Else

Its US release coming on the heels of the just-wrapped Sochi Olympics, where Russia presented a noble image of itself for both domestic and international consumption, the Russian war film Stalingrad seeks to do much the same in cinematic terms. It... More »
  

Documentary Fortnight 2014 Review: CAMPAIGN 2, A Revealing Examination of the Absurdities of Japanese Politics

As the title indicates, Kazuhiro Soda's latest film Campaign 2, the fifth of his self-described "observational documentaries," is a follow-up to his 2007 film Campaign, which followed Kazuhiko "Yama-san" Yamauchi's 2005 run for a city council seat in Kawasaki City,... More »
  

Documentary Fortnight 2014: MoMA's Annual Showcase Offers Innovative, Challenging, and Beautiful Films

The 13th edition of Documentary Fortnight, the Museum of Modern Art's annual showcase of documentary features, short films, and installations, screens from February 14-28. The wide-ranging, international selection, as always, is very impressive, featuring films that are innovative, beautifully made,... More »
  

Review: COLD COMES THE NIGHT Elevates Familiar Genre Elements With Fine Performances And Skillful Execution

In 2009, writer-director Tze Chun garnered much acclaim with his debut feature Children of Invention, a semi-autobiographical film about a single mother and her two children struggling to make ends meet in suburban Boston. At first glance, Chun's follow-up, the... More »
  

Review: LONE SURVIVOR Offers An Intense, Visceral Depiction Of The War Experience

Samuel Fuller, who directed some of the best war movies ever made, and who was a combat veteran himself, famously stated, "To make a real war movie would be to fire at the audience from behind a screen." Peter Berg's... More »
  

Anticipated In 2014: The Films We Most Want To See

With 2014 now fully upon us the Twitch team gathers to take a look at the films we most want to take a look at in the coming year. Is this some sort of scientific poll? Heck no, more just... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Full Disclosure: Twitch's List Of Shame - December

And here we are, at the end of our year-long exploration into the shadowy reaches of classic cinema where we have dared not venture before now. Each of us now experienced up to a dozen highly praised works for the... More »
  

African Diaspora International Film Festival 2013 Brings An Eclectic Mix of Films to NYC

The 21th edition of the African Diaspora International Film Festival screens in New York from November 29 through December 15 at Teachers College at Columbia University, Thalia Cinema and Sharp Theatre at Symphony Space, Quad Cinema, and the Black Spectrum... More »
  

DOC NYC 2013: Award Winners and More Reviews

DOC NYC wrapped this past Thursday, and the jury awards have been announced. In the Viewfinders Competition, "chosen for their distinct directorial visions," according to the festival, the Grand Jury Prize winner was Mahdi Fleifel's A World Not Ours, a... More »
  

DOC NYC, Largest Documentary Festival in U.S., Returns With Best (and Biggest) Slate Yet

DOC NYC, in the four short years of its existence, has now become the largest documentary film festival in the U.S. This year's edition, screening from November 14-21 at IFC Center and the SVA Theatre, brings a vast selection of... More »
  

Review: IT'S ME, IT'S ME, A Surreal Farce On the Nature of Identity

A comically surrealist farce on the nature of identity in the digital age, Miki Satoshi's latest film It's Me, It's Me features an impressively energetic and remarkably varied multiple performance by J-pop star Kamenashi Kazuya as the central character, or... More »
  

"Iranian New Wave 1960s-1970s" At Asia Society Illuminates An Influential But Little-Known Period Of Cinema History

Asia Society's film series "Iranian New Wave 1960s-1970s," screening November 2-22, illuminates one of the lesser known film movements of the 60s and 70s, during which filmmakers in Iran, similarly to other contemporary movements in France, Czechoslovakia, Japan, and Brazil,... More »
  

Review: In WHEN I WALK, A Filmmaker Chronicles His Own Illness With Heart, Humor And Inspiring Resiliency

In 2006, 25 year-old Jason DaSilva experienced a moment that once and for all indicated that his life had irrevocably changed. While on the beach during a family vacation, he suddenly fell down and was unable to get up. As... More »
  

Korean American Film Festival New York 2013 Commemorates The Korean War Armistice With A Vivid And Illuminating Program

The Korean American Film Festival New York (KAFFNY) always includes an impressively eclectic collection of features and shorts, and this year's 7th edition is no exception. However, for the first time, the festival is organized around one specific subject: the... More »
  

Margaret Mead Film Festival 2013 Offers An Impressive Slate of Artfully Made, Provocative Documentaries From Across the Globe

The 2013 edition of the Margaret Mead Film Festival, the American Museum of Natural History's annual international documentary showcase, screens from October 17 through 20. If the films that I was able to preview are any indication, this year's selections... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: THE MISSING PICTURE, A Hauntingly Poetic Work of Emotional and Historical Archeology

Cambodian filmmaker Rithy Panh has devoted his career to documenting the brutal horrors perpetrated on his homeland by the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime, who for four nightmarish years from 1975 to 1979 subjected the citizens under their control to forced... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: WHEN EVENING FALLS ON BUCHAREST OR METABOLISM Interrogates The Film Medium With Elegance And Sly Humor

Corneliu Porumboiu, with just three features now under his belt, has established himself as one of the finest filmmakers of the Romanian new wave. His previous films 12:08 East of Bucharest (2006) and Police, Adjective (2009) impressed film festival audiences... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: ABUSE OF WEAKNESS Turns The True Story Of A Conman's Swindle Into Fascinating But Frustratingly Opaque Art

In 2004, French director Catherine Breillat, famous for making very personal and sexually provocative films such as 36 Fillette (1988), Romance (1999), and Fat Girl (2001), suffered a debilitating stroke caused by a cerebral hemorrhage. This stroke partially paralyzed her... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: AT BERKELEY, A Fascinating, Immersive Examination of the Famed Educational Institution

For 46 years now and counting, the 83-year old filmmaker Frederick Wiseman has carved out an endlessly fruitful niche within his chosen genre: the examination and function of various institutions. His methodology has remained unchanged since his first films in... More »
  

Review: BLUE CAPRICE, A Coldly Detached Observation of Two Mass Murderers

Given the devastating recent history of mass shootings in the U.S., Alexandre Moors' debut feature Blue Caprice is nothing if not timely. Blue Caprice is a speculative imagining of the events which led up to the so-called "Beltway Sniper" shootings... More »
  
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