Christopher Bourne
New York City, New York

Chris is a film critic, editor, blogger, incurable cinephile, and all-around culture maven. He blogs on film at The Bourne Cinema Conspiracy.

Review: IT'S ME, IT'S ME, A Surreal Farce On the Nature of Identity

A comically surrealist farce on the nature of identity in the digital age, Miki Satoshi's latest film It's Me, It's Me features an impressively energetic and remarkably varied multiple performance by J-pop star Kamenashi Kazuya as the central character, or... More »
  

"Iranian New Wave 1960s-1970s" At Asia Society Illuminates An Influential But Little-Known Period Of Cinema History

Asia Society's film series "Iranian New Wave 1960s-1970s," screening November 2-22, illuminates one of the lesser known film movements of the 60s and 70s, during which filmmakers in Iran, similarly to other contemporary movements in France, Czechoslovakia, Japan, and Brazil,... More »
  

Review: In WHEN I WALK, A Filmmaker Chronicles His Own Illness With Heart, Humor And Inspiring Resiliency

In 2006, 25 year-old Jason DaSilva experienced a moment that once and for all indicated that his life had irrevocably changed. While on the beach during a family vacation, he suddenly fell down and was unable to get up. As... More »
  

Korean American Film Festival New York 2013 Commemorates The Korean War Armistice With A Vivid And Illuminating Program

The Korean American Film Festival New York (KAFFNY) always includes an impressively eclectic collection of features and shorts, and this year's 7th edition is no exception. However, for the first time, the festival is organized around one specific subject: the... More »
  

Margaret Mead Film Festival 2013 Offers An Impressive Slate of Artfully Made, Provocative Documentaries From Across the Globe

The 2013 edition of the Margaret Mead Film Festival, the American Museum of Natural History's annual international documentary showcase, screens from October 17 through 20. If the films that I was able to preview are any indication, this year's selections... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: THE MISSING PICTURE, A Hauntingly Poetic Work of Emotional and Historical Archeology

Cambodian filmmaker Rithy Panh has devoted his career to documenting the brutal horrors perpetrated on his homeland by the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime, who for four nightmarish years from 1975 to 1979 subjected the citizens under their control to forced... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: WHEN EVENING FALLS ON BUCHAREST OR METABOLISM Interrogates The Film Medium With Elegance And Sly Humor

Corneliu Porumboiu, with just three features now under his belt, has established himself as one of the finest filmmakers of the Romanian new wave. His previous films 12:08 East of Bucharest (2006) and Police, Adjective (2009) impressed film festival audiences... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: ABUSE OF WEAKNESS Turns The True Story Of A Conman's Swindle Into Fascinating But Frustratingly Opaque Art

In 2004, French director Catherine Breillat, famous for making very personal and sexually provocative films such as 36 Fillette (1988), Romance (1999), and Fat Girl (2001), suffered a debilitating stroke caused by a cerebral hemorrhage. This stroke partially paralyzed her... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: AT BERKELEY, A Fascinating, Immersive Examination of the Famed Educational Institution

For 46 years now and counting, the 83-year old filmmaker Frederick Wiseman has carved out an endlessly fruitful niche within his chosen genre: the examination and function of various institutions. His methodology has remained unchanged since his first films in... More »
  

Review: BLUE CAPRICE, A Coldly Detached Observation of Two Mass Murderers

Given the devastating recent history of mass shootings in the U.S., Alexandre Moors' debut feature Blue Caprice is nothing if not timely. Blue Caprice is a speculative imagining of the events which led up to the so-called "Beltway Sniper" shootings... More »
  

Review: SAMPLE THIS Tells The Fascinating Story of "Apache," One Of The Most Sampled Songs In Music History

Pop quiz - what do these three songs have in common: Nas' "Made You Look," Missy Elliott's "We Run This," and Amy Winehouse's "In My Bed"? If your answer was that they are all built on a sample of "Apache,"... More »
  

Review: 2 GUNS is A Solidly Entertaining, Comedy-Infused Action Film

This summer, the Hollywood movie landscape has become increasingly littered with the desiccated corpses of would-be blockbusters which failed to find their audiences, many probably weary of the seemingly interchangeable array of loud, special-effects heavy spectacles offered to them weekly.... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2013 Review: I HAVE TO BUY NEW SHOES, An Irresistibly Seductive, Bittersweet Romantic Comedy

A romantic movie set in the city of Paris may come across as, and may indeed be, the ultimate cinematic cliché, but writer-director Kitagawa Eriko and producer-cinematographer Iwai Shunji unerringly make it work in I Have to Buy New Shoes,... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2013 Review: IT'S ME, IT'S ME, A Surreal Farce On the Nature of Identity

A comically surrealist farce on the nature of identity in the digital age, Miki Satoshi's latest film It's Me, It's Me features an impressively energetic and remarkably varied multiple performance by J-pop star Kamenashi Kazuya as the central character, or... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2013 Review: I'M FLASH!, A Visually and Sonically Stylish Tale of Gangsters and Religious Cultists

Religious cultists, yakuza hitmen, a lovely bar pickup, and a speeding motorcyclist collide, quite literally, in the genre oddity that is I'M FLASH!, the latest from iconoclastic director Toyoda Toshiaki (9 Souls, The Hanging Garden). This time, Toyoda jettisons the... More »
  

NYAFF 2013 Review: JUVENILE OFFENDER, A Deeply Humanistic and Beautifully Acted Character Study

Juvenile Offender, Kang Yi-kwan's delicately observed, tightly written, deeply humanistic small-scale drama is one of the must-see films of this year's New York Asian Film Festival. Bracingly tough-minded, this film deftly avoids the traps inherent in its narrative material, especially... More »
  

NYAFF 2013 Review: EUNGYO, An Erotically-Charged Tale of Aging and Artistic Inspiration

Jung Ji-woo's fourth feature Eungyo (aka A Muse) has as its basis the salacious premise of a relationship between a 70 year-old man and a 17 year-old girl, which for obvious reasons proved quite controversial upon its release last year... More »
  

Review: KUICHISAN Defies Categorization With Its Haunting, Hypnotic Images and Soundtrack

Maiko Endo's remarkable debut feature Kuichisan is less a film in the conventional sense than a collection of very striking images with musical rhythms, befitting the director's background as a musician. This gives the film quite a hypnotic effect, and... More »
  

BAMcinemaFest 2013 Once Again Brings Some Of The Best Of American Independent Film To Brooklyn

The 5th edition of BAMcinemaFest, an essential annual survey of the best rising talent in American independent film, brings discoveries from Cannes, Sundance, South by Southwest, Berlin, Rotterdam, and other fests to Brooklyn, and it's a guarantee that you will... More »
  

Jackie Chan Takes Manhattan, Discusses His Life, Movie Career, and "I Am Jackie Chan: The Musical"

The fine folks at Subway Cinema and the New York Asian Film Festival scored a major coup last week when they brought action film maestro Jackie Chan to NYC for a two-day visit on June 10 and 11 in advance... More »
  
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