Toronto 2015 Review: LEN AND COMPANY, A Confident Hanging-Out Movie

All men, when they reach a certain age, have a desire to become a hermit - to one degree or another. Maybe it is due to genetic wiring, maybe social conventions. Most ignore it, either lacking the means, or the... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   

Toronto 2015 Review: EVOLUTION, Surreal And Chilling Mystery

I'm a great believer in minimalism, particularly when it comes to body horror in film. Used carefully and deliberately, a few choice scenes can have far more weight in a story and a far more effective impact on the... More »

Toronto 2015 Review: HARDCORE's Visceral Action Will Squeeze Your Balls Off

In some number of years from now when Virtual Reality is finally really here and we're all immersed in first person narratives, we'll look back at Ilya Naishuller's Hardcore and ask, "Were we all really so impressed by this film?"... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   

Toronto 2015 Review: BASKIN Is Creepy, Weird And Amazing

When many people think of contemporary Turkish cinema, the first thing that comes to mind is the Palme d'Or-bait that is the films of Nuri Bilge Ceylan. Methodical (ahem, slow) dramas like Once Upon a Time in Anatolia and Winter's... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   

Toronto 2015 Review: EYE IN THE SKY, A Complex And Darkly Funny Look At The War On Terror

Tsotsi and Rendition director Gavin Hood has set himself a difficult task on multiple levels with his latest effort, Eye In The Sky. He is, first of all, tackling fabulously thorny and morally complex material as he weighs the question... More »
By Todd Brown   

Toronto 2015 Review: Short Doc WORLD FAMOUS GOPHER HOLE MUSEUM Offers A Beautiful, Bizarre And Tragic Slice Of Life

Though it runs only twenty minutes, Chelsea McMullan and Douglas Nayler's World Famous Gopher Hole Museum makes an over sized impression. Finding a deeply human soul in its even more deeply quirky subject matter, all of it presented flawlessly in... More »
By Todd Brown   

Toronto 2015 Review: Van Warmerdam's SCHNEIDER VS BAX Delivers Deliciously Dark Comedy

Context may not be quite everything in life but it is almost always pretty damn important and so it should be noted that if I were to describe Alex Van Warmerdam's most recent feature film as a pleasant little diversion... More »
By Todd Brown   

Venice 2015 Review: A COPY OF MY MIND Sells Itself On Romance And Intrigue

Acclaimed Indonesian filmmaker Joko Anwar returns with his fifth feature, A Copy of My Mind, a tale of love, passion and how to get ahead in the back alleys of sprawling Jakarta. Made with the help of CJ Entertainment, as... More »
By Pierce Conran   

Toronto 2015 Review: DEMOLITION, A Brilliant Tapestry Of Emotion

It's fair to say I've become enamoured of one Jake Gyllenhaal of late. Sure, the man has piercing eyes and lovely, bushy eyebrows, but more to the point is the power and poignance he's been bringing to screen. From modern... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Toronto 2015 Review: BLACK Paints A Vivid Picture Of The Violent, Seedy Side Of Brussels

When you're hanging with a posse who murder, steal, rape and share the bed with the same women and commit every crime imaginable, it's time to reassess your life.  Black is a movie you will not forget once you see... More »
By Chase Whale   

Toronto 2015 Review: ROOM, A Character Study Wrapped In A Thriller

At their best, films can literally change our perspective. We can be put into the position, visually and psychologically, of the characters on screen. With montage we see through their eyes, with dialogue we get into their souls. It's... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Toronto 2014 Review: ST. VINCENT Delivers Vintage Bill Murray

Not everybody watches quite as many films as some of us. There are those where getting out to a theatre isn't a weekly (or, in my case, daily) occurrence, where the schlepp of getting there, standing in line, getting... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Toronto 2014 Review: THE LOOK OF SILENCE Is A Film For The Ages

Since I saw it back at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival, Joshua Oppenheimer's The Act Of Killing has lived up to my early impression - that the work is truly one of the great films of all time,... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Toronto 2014 Review: THE EDITOR Is Eager To Please

The directors of The Editor, Adam Brooks and Matthew Kennedy, along with the rest of their cohorts from VHS-obsessed Winnipeg film collective Astron-6, must have been mighty pissed when they caught wind of Berberian Sound Studio. Peter Strickland's 2012 film was... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   

Toronto 2014 Review: THE VOICES, Silly And Schizoid

It's days after I saw it, and I still haven't decided if Marjane Satrapi's The Voices is sublime or shit. I think, frankly, that it's an unholy combination of both, a mess of a film that still has moments... More »
By Jason Gorber   

Toronto 2014 Review: LEVIATHAN Takes A Gorgeous And Savage Look At Modern Russia

A rundown fishing town on the coast of the Arctic Ocean is the rugged edge-of-the-world stage for Andrey Zvyagintsev's complex, but quite accessible, new film. There is a visual mastery of relating wide open natural spaces, with precise man-made interiors, present... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   

Toronto 2014 Review: '71 Is A Remarkably Assured, Emotionally Powerful Debut

Yann Demange is very clearly a filmmaker who knows what sort of stories he wants to tell and how he wants to tell them. The sort who clearly knows his own skill set, how to best put it to use,... More »
By Todd Brown   

Toronto 2014 Review: Jennifer Aniston Bares Her Soul In CAKE

"I hope you're ready to be depressed," whispered the person sitting next to me to no one in particular as the opening frames of Cake started to roll. Indeed, director Daniel Barnz's film about a woman confronting debilitating pain, drug... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   

Toronto 2014 Review: THE DUKE OF BURGUNDY, A Sublime And Specific Sex Comedy

Starting off with what is undoubtedly the opening credit sequence of the year, Peter Strickland's The Duke of Burgundy never ceases to surprise and delight over its 100 minutes, offering a dry but meticulous humour and rhythm. Those credits, offering... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   

Toronto 2014 Review: THE IMITATION GAME Falls More Than A Bit Flat

From a British Nation that has had its fair share of scientific geniuses, it's perhaps no surprise that the life and work of Alan Turing has spawned its fair share of dramatic works. There have been TV versions, drama/docs, and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
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