Cannes 2014 Review: THE SALVATION Is Salivatingly Good

It's no longer really much of a bold move to call Mads Mikkelsen one of the finest actors working in the world today. A consummate thespian, his performances are always intoxicating to watch, be they in silly pulp-populism when playing... More »
  

NYIFF 2014 Review: In SNIFFER A Man Finds Himself In The Dirty Laundry Of Others

Most people show a lot of who they are through their interactions with others. Sure, there's the person we think we are, or the person that we imagine ourselves to be on our best days, but it's really how we... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Cannes 2014 Review: Cronenberg's MAPS TO THE STARS Gets Lost Along The Way

This doesn't bode well.For the second film in a row, David Cronenberg has made a stinker. Yes, there were some bits in Cosmopolis that didn't suck, but it was hardly vintage DC. As I mentioned in my review for that... More »
  

Cannes 2014 Review: WINTER SLEEP Asks The Tough Questions

Nuri Bilge Ceylan trained as a photographer and has mined the expressive terrain of his native Anatolia to great effect throughout his career. As a director, he has used the landscape not simply as a backdrop, but often as an... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2014 Review: SAINT LAURENT is Stylish, Fun and Empty

For the second time this year, the gilded life of fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent is getting the big screen treatment. The first was the paint by the numbers biopic Yves Saint Laurent, a gentle, actor's film made with... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2014 Review: A HARD DAY Is Easy-To-Love Genre Cinema

If you feel that tough genre fare in Korea has been spinning its wheels of late, you're not alone. While generally well made, the élan of yesteryear's hardboiled Korean thrillers has recently been replaced by a growing sense of familiarity... More »
  

Cannes 2014 Review: IT FOLLOWS, A Somber, Effective And Assured Thriller

With a terrific cold opening, a somber and effective mood, strong performances and assured direction, there's lots to love about It Follows. It's a kind of pure thriller, with a few shocks mixed into what's a remarkably consistent vision that... More »
  

Fantaspoa 2014 Review: RABBIT WOMAN (MUJER CONEJO) Is Part Thriller, Part B-Movie, And Always Pretty Damn Good

Ana Yang is the name of the lead character in Rabbit Woman (Mujer Conejo), a live-action film from Argentina that features some animated sequences as well. The name of its director is Veronica Chen, so we can indeed deduce the... More »
  

Cannes 2014 Review: A GIRL AT MY DOOR Is Korean Cinema At Its Finest

Screening in the Cannes Film Festival's Un Certain Regard section this year is A Girl at My Door, a film that is so well-wrought that one can't help but be swept up in its artistry, which effortlessly plunges us into... More »
  

Fantaspoa 2014 Review: DEVIL IN MY RIDE, An Amusing Road/Buddy/Exorcism Movie

If The Battery approached the zombie movie with a very low budget but lots of fun and ingenuity, Devil in My Ride tries to do the same with the exorcism film. Gary Michael Schultz's first feature-length effort centers on more... More »
  

Cannes 2014 Review: MR. TURNER Paints A Blurry Picture

Mike Leigh's latest offering lustfully tackles the life, work and loves of Joseph Mallord William Turner, the legendary 19th Century British artist whose landscape paintings are revered around the world. It's a carefully constructed film, part performance piece and part... More »
  

Fantaspoa 2014 Review: DARKNESS BY DAY (EL DÍA TRAJO LA OSCURIDAD), Solid Atmospheric Horror From Argentina

The countryside of Argentina is the setting for Martín Desalvo's Darkness by Day (El Día Trajo la Oscuridad), a little horror film that rests almost entirely on its two main actresses, Mora Recalde and Romina Paula. They play Virginia and Anabel,... More »
  

Cannes 2014 Review: GRACE OF MONACO Is A Risible Mess

It gives me no pleasure to say that the opening film of this year's Cannes International Film Festival had members of the press mocking it during its running time. At the second screening, when the credits rolled and the lights were... More »
  

Review: Dutch Skate-boarding Doc ZOMBIE: THE RESURRECTION OF TIM ZOM Grinds Deeper Than The Surface

(Dude, who scratched my car?) In the past, the International Film Festival Rotterdam was sometimes chided for not having much locally-made content in its program, being maybe a bit TOO international for its own good. Recent editions have remedied that... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Jeonju 2014 Review: Grand and Mysterious, THE AVIAN KIND Soars

A great many gems have emerged from the Korean independent scene of late, but some worry that the milieu lacks the unique voices that it used to cultivate 10 to 15 years ago. Director Shin Yeon-shick may already be on... More »
  

Jeonju 2014 Review: Meditative POHANG HARBOR Doesn't Quite Connect

In a country with so many hardships out in the open and an unspoken swell of pain swirling just beneath the surface, there needs to be a release valve for the frustrations of ordinary citizens. In Korea, that role is... More »
  

Udine 2014 Review: MY PRETEND GIRLFRIEND Unfurls A Quietly Heartbreaking Tale Of First Love

Known for his great contributions to the world of Japanese commercials, Yakumo Saiji has finally decided to venture into feature-length filmmaking, and for the world premiere of his debut, he chose the Udine Far East Film Festival. Seeing that the... More »
  

Udine 2014 Review: MAY WE CHAT Is A Dynamic, Dark Youth Drama Bolstered By Three Great Performances

Emphasized by sugary and excessively colorful visuals, the beginning of Philip Young's May We Chat epitomizes everything that's most shallow about contemporary youth culture. Teenagers consciously trapped in a virtual realm take pictures of shoes, food, themselves, and communicate via... More »
  

Udine 2014 Review: THE SNOW WHITE MURDER CASE Gives A Stunning New Angle To Familiar Thriller Formula

A young and beautiful office lady has been brutally murdered in a national park near Tokyo. With no suspects in sight, the mysterious case seems to be barely moving forward, until an ambitious, ramen-loving journalist seeking publicity starts throwing accusations... More »
  

Udine 2014 Review: THE JOURNEY, A Feel-Good Road Film About The Ups And Downs Of Cross-Cultural Relationships

Given its heartwarming appeal and universally applicable message about cross-cultural relationships, from the western point of view it's not really hard to see why Chiu Keng Guan's The Journey has become Malaysia's highest grossing domestic picture of all time. Considering... More »
  
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