Review: IN THE HEART OF THE SEA, Old-Fashioned In The Best Possible Way

Billed as the story that inspired Moby Dick, Ron Howard's adaptation of Nathaniel Philbrick's National Book Award winner is a shamelessly old-fashioned sea-faring yarn recounting the true story of the Essex, a Nantucket whaleship that sank after being attacked by... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: HITCHCOCK/TRUFFAUT Is A Cinephile's Wet Dream

We all know that everything has a meaning in a Hitchcock film - gesture, pose, framing, inanimate objects, camera movements, architecture, everything. It's layers upon layers of these cinematic elements that make his films stand the test of time.... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: DAWN, A Surreal Image Of Soviet Life

Tales of mythic figures, particularly those whose myth is perpetuated by governments, are ripe fodder for film. This can be especially interesting if someone like myself is ignorant of said mythic figure. Such is the case with Dawn, Laila Pakalnina's... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: THE AUTOMATIC HATE, Blood Is Not Thicker Than Water

Not all families are good or well-adjusted; there are often rifts (reasonable or not) between parents and children, siblings, cousins. Some of us might find out about skeletons in a closet, and sometimes those skeletons are best left undisturbed. In Justin... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: LOEV, Lovers In A Dangerous Time

Same-sex activity is illegal in India, punishable by imprisonment. The release there of Deepa Mehta's film Fire, about a love affair between two women, incited violent protests in 1998. So the fact that Sudhanshu Saria's debut feature Loev was made... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: THANK YOU FOR BOMBING Shines a Critical Light on War Reporting

War correspondants can be mythic figures, something of romantic heroes. They go to dangerous places in order to bring us the truth. It's been said that it was the reporter's stories that helped begin protests against the Vietnam War; although... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: BODY, The Connection Between Flesh and Spirit

Malgorzata Szumowska's previous films (Elles, In the Name Of) have looked at the conflict between mind and body, in a darkly serious tone. In her latest film Body (which won the Silver Bear for Best Director at Berlinale), she again... More »
  

Five Flavours 2015 Review: CROCODILE Drifts Through Arresting Yet Ponderous Poverty

Fable and reality mingle in Francis Xavier Pasion's Crocodile, a film riddled with beautiful imagery and terrible poverty. Based on real events and bookended by documentary footage of the story's real protagonists, the unique, swampy landscape of the Agusan Marsh... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: DON'T LOOK AT ME THAT WAY Asks Much, Answers Little

Most stories are about love: falling in love, falling out of love, betrayal, passion, death. And often, there is a good lover and a bad lover, or at least, someone with whom the audience is supposed to share perspective. But... More »
  

Los Cabos 2015 Review: YOU'LL KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH ME (SABRÁS QUÉ HACER CONMIGO), The Mysteries Of Men And Women

Nicolás thinks it's love at first sight. Emerging from an appointment with his doctor, Nicolás (Pablo Derqui) sees a lovely woman at a hospital. Their eyes meet, and the attraction is instantaneous and mutual. They exchange light banter, and Nicolás... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: THE GOOD DINOSAUR Narrowly Dodges Critical Extinction

One can scarcely fault the latest Pixar film for merely being good and not great. After all, it's right there in the title. The Good Dinosaur is the celebrated animation studio's 16th feature length film, and, following this past summer's Inside... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: CREED (AKA ROCKY VII) Goes The Distance

"Which do you think will do better, this or Rocky?" That was the box office question posed to me by a fellow critic immediately following the advance screening of Pixar's The Good Dinosaur, which will open the same day as Creed.... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Blu-ray Review: Finally, THE APU TRILOGY Receives The Attention It Deserves

I've been writing about Indian cinema for a little over five years now. I've been a fan of Indian cinema for right around ten years. Yet, until a couple of weeks ago, I had never seen any of the films... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: VICTOR FRANKENSTEIN, Watch This Before Creating A Monster

Daniel Radcliffe and James McAvoy make for an unlikely yet extremely likable pairing in Victor Frankenstein, which transforms Mary Shelley's dark novel into a cheeky action-adventure picture. On the face of it, the idea of making Igor the hero is... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: UNDER THE SUN, A Peek At North Korean Propaganda

For much of the world, North Korea is an enigma. What little we know of it comes either from those who have escaped (who do not tend to paint a pretty picture) or what little information comes from the country... More »
  

Review: KEEPER OF DARKNESS Exorcises Nick Cheung's Directorial Demons

While remaining committed to the horror genre, Nick Cheung's second outing as director is a huge improvement on 2013's Hungry Ghost Ritual. Again casting himself in the lead, Cheung this time leaves writing duties to Yeung Sin Ling (Inner Senses,... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: GHOST MOUNTAINEER, The Scariest Stories Are True

Growing up in Canada, you develop a healthy respect for the cold, when you could die just from being caught outside, not to mention activities that could have you buried under snow, or trapped in places with no civilization for... More »
  

Five Flavours 2015 Review: THE LIGHT SHINES ONLY THERE Finds Hope In The Darkness

Sleepy Hokkaido sets the stage for an unusual friendship in The Light Shines Only There, in which a stoic young man holding on to a secret pain befriends a yellow-toothed, happy-go-lucky wastrel on parol. Destitution, emotional turmoil abound, yet this... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: MA, A Mesmerizing Study In Movement And Myth

Celia Rowlson-Hall studied choreography and dance, but has turned her considerable talents in those areas to film and video, and her first feature-length film Ma is a experimental wonder, a strange retelling of the Virgin Mary, which becomes a pilgrimage... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: NIGHT SHIFT, Iranian Drama Meets Hitchcock

Niki Karimi has had a stellar career in Iranian cinema, first beginning as an actor, and moving into writing and directing in the past decade. Her most recent feature, Night Shift, is a serious and unusual blend of domestic drama... More »
  
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