Sundance 2015 Review: THINGS OF THE AIMLESS WANDERER, A World-Class Stunner

To be absolutely mesmerized by a film, totally transfixed, is a rare happening in cinema, but should be the norm, right? Rwanda director Kivu Ruhorahoza's Things Of The Aimless Wanderer is just such a film, spectacular and ambitious in all... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: CARTEL LAND Documents A Moral Quagmire

An astonishing journalistic achievement, Cartel Land captures in unprecedented ways the moral quagmire that inexorably links the consumers of drugs in the U.S. with the suppliers south of the border. What sets this film apart is the unique way... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL, More Clever Than You Think

The title for Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is kind of appalling, a sing-song rhyming cadence that reminds of Lobo's buttery 1971 pop hit "Me And You and a Dog Named Boo". Its premise -- a young... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: ANGELS OF REVOLUTION, Soviet Avant-gardists Unite

Ethno-omnibus The Celestial Wives of Meadow Mari by Russian filmmaker Aleksei Fedorchenko, a witty and original wanderlust throughout the folklore peculiarities of the Meadow Mari people, a group considered to be last pagans in Europe, was one of the... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: ENTERTAINMENT, Seeking The Legendary Laugh To Masterful Effect

Many would say there are two distinct poles to cinema-going. There are those times when you want something warm and familiar. It's comfort food you can share with your family. Not too sweet or sour, not too heavy. And then... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: THE BRONZE Is Comedy Gold

This summer is sure to produce an onslaught of mindless trash disguised as comedy. Adam Sandler will make more cool millions, Paul Blart will potentially earn more undeserved revenue, and comedic celebrities who have shone in better films will be... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Review: CASA AMOR: EXCLUSIVE FOR LADIES, But Really Just A Man's World

Every so often, Korean cinema presents us with a new film, filled with the promise of titillating erotica. Invariably, these turn out to be rather chaste affairs and Casa Amor: Exclusive for Ladies (the original title of which is Working... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: Kevin Costner's BLACK OR WHITE Is Anything But

Dances with Wolves. Field of Dreams. JFK. And now, Black or White. That's how Kevin Costner, who not only stars in, but financed this highly approachable light drama about contemporary race relations, is pitching the film. In his varied and overall... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Slamdance 2015 Review: YOSEMITE Beautifully Captures The Fearful Majesty Of Boyhood

What is it about childhood that makes us adults so wary of who we once were? Perhaps it is that great fear of the unknown, a shadow, a whisper of adulthood that scares us as children into submission of these... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: HOURLY HUSBAND, A Low-Brow Comedy About Midlife Relationships

The Czech comedy Hourly Husband, a feature debut by Tomáš Svoboda, who comes from a theatre environment, falls into the niche of easy-going comedies designed after a rather folksy blueprint. Hourly Husband addresses the very particular issues of a very particular... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: AS THE GODS WILL Leaves You Gasping For More

(Putting the Fear of God into someone was never taken as literally as here...) Miike Takashi must, by now, be the most experienced director in the world in several genres, especially if those genres are vaguely defined as "gory and... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Slamdance 2015 Review: THEY LOOK LIKE PEOPLE, DIY Terror At Its Very Best

It begins in the dark hollows of your mind. But you can feel it in your heart. Pumping through your veins. The notion that something is wrong. That the world is wrong. That reality is not what it seems. That... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: THE OVERNIGHT Goes There

It's so incredibly tempting to reveal all the bizarre places Patrick Brice's new film, The Overnight, takes its audiences, who, if they're anything like this viewer, will likely watch the film with mouths gleefully agape.The film opens in the bedroom... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Review: GIRLHOOD, Social Realism With An Edge

Girlhood (Bande des Filles) quite literally kicks off to a running start. In the first second in the very first shot, a rush of decked-out football players come hurtling head-on directly at the camera. Backed by thumping, synth-heavy electropop, we... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: AMIRA AND SAM, A Rare, Smart And Funny Love Story

A man and a woman meet cute. Opposites attract. Hostility melts and attraction grows. New York City. While all these standard romantic-comedy elements are present in Amira and Sam, they share time and space with the specter of the war... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: PROJECT ALMANAC, A Cautionary Time-Travel Thriller For Teens

Something funny happened on the way to delivering a found-footage time-travel movie for teenagers: it grew a heart and developed a conscience. Project Almanac (formerly titled Welcome to Yesterday) features science nerds, unrequited crushes, and an extended concert sequence. All... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Rotterdam 2015: REALITY, Not Just Another Headscratcher By Dupieux

French DJ-cum-filmmaker Quentin Dupieux, aka Mr.Oizo, invaded the cinema landscape rather abruptly through his Dadaistic effort Rubber, following a killing tire in a twisted slasher formula. The comic element aside, Dupieux knew what he was up to since the first minute,... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: A PIGEON SAT ON A BRANCH REFLECTING ON EXISTENCE, A Masterpiece

Only a few living directors have achieved status in world cinema as Roy Andersson did. Calling him a cult director seems like a huge understatement, even though we are talking about a rather narrow body of work consisting of three features... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Slamdance 2015 Review: CONCRETE LOVE, An Intimate, Immaculate Look At A Family Of Architects

We all wish to be immortalized in some way. To be remembered for something extraordinary or meaningful. Most of us will be remembered by the way we loved, who we loved and how we loved. It is what we do... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: POSTPARTUM. So, Speaking Of Six-Minute Emotional Roller Coasters

What a delightful 6 minutes. If by delightful I mean creepy as fuck. Which I do.When we're met at the door by a disheveled and demented blonde beauty with bloodstained hands and a batshiteatingcrazy grin, and a baby in the... More »
By Stuart Muller   
  
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