Review: PARASYTE PART 1, Slow Burn Alien Takeover Paves Way For Part 2

After becoming one of Japan's most bankable directors off the back of mega-hit The Eternal Zero, Yamazaki Takashi is bound to have another success on his hands with his latest, an adaptation of Iwaaki Hitoshi's popular manga, Parasyte. Himizu's Sometani... More »
  

AFI Fest 2014 Review: 10,000 KM And The Space Between

10,000 KM is a film that knows exactly what it means to be in a long distance relationship. Having lived through one himself, director Carlos Marques-Marcet ingeniously communicates the experience through a minimalism that tugs at the heartstrings far... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Cairo 2014 Review: QUEEN AND COUNTRY, Funny and Heartfelt Nostalgia

John Boorman's 1987 film Hope and Glory, about the London Blitz seen through the eyes of a nine-year-old boy, is a favourite in the Rowan-Legg household (seriously, we can all quote it almost verbatim to the point of annoying guests).... More »
  

Los Cabos 2014 Review: FOR THOSE ABOUT TO ROCK: THE STORY OF RODRIGO Y GABRIELA Salutes The Mexican Guitar Duo

For Those About to Rock: The Story of Rodrigo y Gabriela is a straight celebration of Mexican guitar duo Rodrigo and Gabriela, going from their origins in Mexico City to their eventual worldwide success. Mexican journalist and the documentary's director... More »
  

Review: BUTTER ON THE LATCH, A Fascinating And Truly Original Work Of Art

One of the most fascinating and fully-formed talents to emerge this year is director, actress, and performance artist Josephine Decker, who now has two accomplished features under her belt. The first, Butter on the Latch, had its world premiere at... More »
  

Review: ROSEWATER, A Disappointing Passion Project By Jon Stewart

It's safe to say that for the last several decades Jon Stewart has been one of the most powerful voices in comedy. Since taking over The Daily Show, his show has been a beacon for popular American political satire, showing... More »
  

Review: BAD TURN WORSE, A Crackling Small Town Thriller

The feature debut from directorial siblings Simon and Zeke Hawkins is a tense and earthy film noir that wears its pulp influences proudly on its sleeve as it weaves a tale of love, betrayal and escape through the underbelly of... More »
  

Review: FOXCATCHER, A Rewarding Look Into A Cold And Strange World

John Eleuthère du Pont, one of the heirs to the vast Du Pont fortune, had it all, it seemed. Wealthy almost beyond measure, he studied and wrote on ornithology and was an avid philatelist, having paid a record (at the... More »
  

St. Louis 2014 Review: THE MAKINGS OF YOU Makes A Noteworthy Debut

Whenever Hollywood comes to St. Louis, Missouri (my hometown) the filmmakers are inevitably bowled over by the architecture, the vibe, and the sheer possibilities the city has to offer in terms of diverse filming locations. In the past few decades,... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: Kurosawa's SEVENTH CODE, More Complex And Thrilling Than It First Appears

Those expecting another genre bending, bone-chilling spectacle from J-horror master helmer Kurosawa Kiyoshi may be a little disappointed with his low-budget, brisk, slow-moving 2013 feature Seventh Code. Without explaining anything, Kurosawa throws the viewer into a story that at... More »
  

Review: THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY - PART 1 Slows Series To A Crawl

With two global smashes that have banked $1.5 billion between them, the Hunger Games series has captured the imagination of spectators around the world with a well-balanced combination of spectacle and emotional depth. Mockingjay - Part 1, the first part... More »
  

Book Review: Shawn Levy's DE NIRO: A LIFE Opens Up The Life And Films Of Robert De Niro

For me, a good writer makes you want to re-watch movies you've seen a dozen times. That's what Shawn Levy does with De Niro: A Life (Crown Archetype, 2014, 600 pages), a new biography that digs respectfully into the actor's... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: THE CHALLAT OF TUNIS, Brilliant And Disturbing Satire

The words 'satire' and 'mockumentary', when referring to films, might automatically be thought to reference humour. But there is no humour, except very dark, in director Kaouther Ben Hania's brilliant The Challat of Tunis. It is a searing portrait of... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: THE CUT, A Good Epic Journey

With the exception of Atom Egoyan's Ararat, the Armenian Genocide has not had much attention in Western cinema. German-Turkish filmmaker Fatih Akin, whose previous films have often looked at issues of the marginalized, transnational cultures and violence, attempts to tackle... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: THEEB Doesn't Quite Live Up to its Promise

Stories of war or violent conflict can often seem more acute and terrifying through the eyes of a child, especially if it is only from the periphery, when the child knows less than the audience. Theeb, Jordanian director Naji Abu's... More »
  

Review: FROM INSIDE Rides A Depressing Train Of Thought

(For those who thought Snowpiercer wasn't somber enough...) Cee, a young pregnant woman, sits on a giant train which drives through a post-apocalyptic landscape. Nobody knows if the train's destination still exists, or even if there are tracks beyond the... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: DOCTOR WHO S8E12, DEATH IN HEAVEN (Or, Maniacal Missy And Her Cybermen)

While last week's "Dark Water" was patient and tense in ways Doctor Who rarely is, this finale reverts to the mode of rushing around while nothing that happens makes any sense. It has more than a few moments of brilliance, but... More »
  

Review: SET FIRE TO THE STARS is Cinematic Poetry and Rage

It isn't easy to portray the literary arts on screen. Apart from having someone recite from a book (which can become tedious), the challenge becomes how to find the connection between the writer being portrayed, their work, and how that... More »
  

Tokyo 2014 Review: GARM WARS: THE LAST DRUID, Mamoru Oshii Delivers Magic Dogs Amidst Turgid Fantasy

Mamoru Oshii has built a loyal following over the years with his penchant for thought-provoking animated features, 1995's Ghost in the Shell being his masterpiece, but the turgid fantasy stylings of Garm Wars: The Last Druid will test the most... More »
  

Review: HANGAR 10 Is A Found Footage Dud

I got a little excited when I heard that the producers of Creep and Severance (two good films) were involved in a new film from IFC about aliens, Hangar 10. However, that's where my interest ended. Upon watching the film, I can say... More »
  
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