New York Asian 2015 Review: IT'S ALREADY TOMORROW IN HONG KONG, A Charming Romantic Travelogue

Here's the basic plotline of producer and now first-time writer-director Emily Ting's immensely charming romance It's Already Tomorrow in Hong Kong, boiled down to its basic essence. A man and a woman meet, and (spoiler alert) fall in love over... More »
  

Munich 2015 Review: CIVIL SERVANTS Gazes Behind The Scenes Of German Police

It is the doubt we even face when we are totally committed and the way we have to erase some of your principles to find a world we can live in. Civil Servants, the first feature-length documentary by Maria Wilke... More »
  

Review: CLOSER TO GOD, Cloning With A Conscience

Turning a hot-button issue into a dramatic soap opera would be the easy way out. Skipping over the procedures and processes that would be involved, Closer to God goes directly to the creation of a clone and then asks, "What... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: CARTEL LAND, Mexico, Drugs, And The U.S. Battle

An astonishing journalistic achievement, Cartel Land captures in unprecedented ways the moral quagmire that inexorably links the consumers of drugs in the U.S. with the suppliers south of the border. What sets this film apart is the unique way... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Munich 2015 Review: EMBRACE OF THE SERPENT Explores Spirits Of The Colombian Amazon

Inspired by Theodor Koch-Grunberg and Richard Evans Schultes, the first explorers of the Colombian Amazon, Embrace of the Serpent is a spiritual quest with a political regret. We follow two stories of German explorers (one of them is Jan... More »
  

New York Asian 2015 Review: TAKSU, An Erotically Charged Island Sojourn

Taksu, the second feature by actress, producer, and now director Sugino Kiki, takes its title from the Balinese concept (often associated with dance) of artistry and charisma that taps into divine, spiritual power. And though it may be going too... More »
  

Review: TERMINATOR GENISYS, The Embodiment Of Fan Disservice

The fifth instalment of the troubled sci-fi time travel series reveals itself to be a frustrating reboot-sequel hybrid, cherry-picking iconic moments from throughout the franchise and reworking them into a confused and mostly absurd new narrative. The result is a... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: MAGIC MIKE XXL, Like A Classic Hong Kong Action Movie, Only With Strippers

As a delirious musical fantasy, Magic Mike XXL is spectacular. As a movie? Not so much. Writer/producer Reid Carolin, who also penned 2012's Magic Mike, constructs the sequel as pure fan service, dispensing with any possible distractions, such as characterizations... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Filmfest Munich Review: THE VOICE OF SOKUROV, Another Boring Film On An Exciting Filmmaker

It seems to be of great importance to film festivals around the globe to include films about filmmakers in their program. This genre guarantees a certain interest among the festival visitors and is usually very, well, boring. Of course, there... More »
  

Review: ERNIE BISCUIT Is Deliciously Good

He has a funny name. He's got a disability. He is terribly lonely... He is Ernie Biscuit, a deaf Parisian taxidermist. If you are thinking to yourself that his story couldn't be too interesting, you are mistaken. Great storytellers can... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Review: MINIONS Tickles Funnybone, But Scratches No Itch

(Nevertheless it will make.... MILLIONS!) In the increasingly vast catalog of computer-generated animated feature films, the two Despicable Me films aren't exactly considered to be top tier. Weak in story and painfully sentimental, what watchability they have is completely owned... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: THE PRINCESS OF FRANCE, Shakespeare, Beguiling And Charming

The Princess of France is Argentine director Matías Piñeiro's third entry in his series of Shakespeare-inspired films, which he calls his "Shakespearead." The first two of these were his 43-minute short Rosalinda (2011), inspired by "As You Like It," and... More »
  

Review: FELT, A United Front Of Creative Forces

There comes a moment early on in Toad Road director Jason Banker's Felt which beautifully sets the tone for what is to unfold over the next 70 or so minutes of his second narrative feature. After partying with a few young... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: THE LITTLE DEATH, A Cheeky, Cracking Australian Comedy

Josh Lawson is a charming and cheeky fellow. His goofiness on screen and well-mannered presence has permeated execrable dross from Australia and made it watchable. His painful turn as Doug, the loser partner in Showtime's black comedy series House of... More »
  

Review: BIG GAME, A Totally Fresh Genre Film

It's such a delight to see a film that plays by its own rules, fulfilling the premise that it sets up, and delivering right through to the conclusion. This is especially true for Midnight movies, as often you get... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

LA Film Fest Review: VICTORIA, A Poem In Action

"You just had to be there" In a post-FOMO (fear of missing out) age this phrase is tantamount to death. "You just had to be there." It's what I said to Twitch Editor Ben Umstead as we walked out of... More »
  

Review: TED 2 Boasts Few Laughs In Awkward Mix Of Lewd Humor And Classic Drama

Seth MacFarlane and Mark Wahlberg team up once again for Ted 2, an outing that is just as bawdy as its hit predecessor, but more scattershot, even by the standards of the mind who brought us Family Guy. Ted 2... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: ...IN THE DARK, You Have To Face Your Inner Demons

Indie filmmaker David Spaltro's follow up to his award-winning Things I Don't Understand, titled ...In The Dark, is an independently produced horror feature. Like Spaltro's earlier films, this is also set in modern day New York. The story concerns Bethany (Grace Folsom),... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Review: ABCD 2 Reshuffles The Dance Movie Deck

Disney UTV's ABCD 2 is a follow-up to their surprise 2013 hit film, Any Body Can Dance, this time with the title officially shortened to the hashtag friendly version for today's short attention span audience. That urge to abbreviate has... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

LA Film Fest 2015 Review: TOO LATE A Confident, Stylish Debut

There is a classic Hollywood feel that prevails throughout Dennis Hauck's debut feature Too Late. Namely this is due to the fact that it's shot on good old 35MM film -- a feat almost never attempted in today's world of... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  
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