Review: THE LAZARUS EFFECT Flatlines

If this review is nothing special, that's because it's in keeping with the film it's about. This being a resurrection horror flick, reviewers would ordinarily be bending over backwards looking for new ways to cleverly utilize back-from-the-dead wordplay, but in... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: FOCUS, A Fun Trifle

It's fair to say that Focus is the best Will Smith film in what seems like several decades. It's equally fair to say that's not exactly saying very much. Still, this quirky con-man flick is actually loads of fun,... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: MAPS TO THE STARS, Cold, Dreary, And Dull

This doesn't bode well. For the second film in a row, David Cronenberg has made a stinker. Yes, there were some bits in Cosmopolis that didn't suck, but it was hardly vintage DC. As I mentioned in my review for... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: EVERLY Fails Its Heroine, Story, And The Audience

Joe Lynch's latest, Everly, is a fairly standard shoot-em-up action movie. Think Die Hard. Both take place at Christmas (a seasonal assault in its own right), but instead of resourceful Officer John McClane fighting off a swarm of bad guys... More »
By Rachel Fox   
  

Review: OUT OF THE DARK, Strong And Persuasive Suspense In South America

Attention, white people: Why do you keep going where you're not wanted? At first blush, Out of the Dark falls easily into the category of horror films in which white people -- usually Americans -- trespass into unknown territories, leading... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: ANA MARIA IN NOVELA LAND, Charting The Familiar With Uncommon Insight

Young and willful, Ana Maria Soto loses jobs as easily as she live-tweets her favorite telenovela. It just comes naturally to the 24-year-old woman, who still lives at home with her middle-class parents and makes grand statements about her principles... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: '71, A Remarkably Assured, Emotionally Powerful Debut

Yann Demange is very clearly a filmmaker who knows what sort of stories he wants to tell and how he wants to tell them, the sort who clearly knows his own skill set, how to best put it to use,... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Review: MY LIFE DIRECTED BY NICOLAS WINDING REFN, Awkward And Thoroughly Intriguing

Note to filmmakers: If you capture the legendary Alejandro Jodorowsky in conversation with another filmmaker and he turns to the camera to ask you a question, be sure to lead with that. Wisely, that's what first-time filmmaker Liv Corfixen does... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: THE SALVATION, A Hell Of A Lot Of Fun

It's no longer really much of a bold move to call Mads Mikkelsen one of the finest actors working in the world today. A consummate thespian, his performances are always intoxicating to watch, be they in silly pulp-populism when playing... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: BETTER CALL SAUL S1E04, HERO (Or, The Plan Comes Together)

With its fourth impressive episode so far, we can now confidently say that Better Call Saul knows what its doing and is doing it well. It's a worthy successor to Breaking Bad, not because it slavishly mimics what that show... More »
By Simon Cocks   
  

Review: WATCHERS OF THE SKY, How To Fight Genocide

Raphael. Ben. Samantha. Luis. Emmanuel. All are ordinary names for ordinary people who have one thing in common: an extraordinary desire to stop genocide. As explored in Edet Belzberg's documentary Watchers of the Sky, all five individuals recognized that a... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: JOY OF MAN'S DESIRING, An Unusually Mature And Assured Feature Debut

First-time helmer Sugita Masakazu made a splash at the Berlin International Film Festival last year with Joy of Man's Desiring, a quietly devastating and deeply lyrical picture paying tribute to all the children who have lost loved ones as a... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: DYKE HARD's Zany Queer Musical Rock and Roll Extravaganza Worships The Best Of Trash

The Berlinale belongs in the triumvirate of most followed film festivals, eagerly pushing its fingers on the pulse of world cinema. As such, it brings a vast variety of oeuvres from all over the globe dubbed as arthouse films. Many... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: VIDEOPHILIA (AND OTHER VIRAL SYNDROMES) Lust and Loathing in Viral Lima

The emerging director Juan Daniel F. Molero premiered his second film Videophilia (And Other Viral Syndromes) in the shrine of progressive audiovisual endeavours: Rotterdam. This rising star -- and somewhat young renaissance man -- is currently fiercely multitasking as director,... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Thailand International Film Destination Festival 2015 Brings Stars To Bangkok

The third annual Thailand International Film Destination Festival wound up last week with the glittering pantheon of the Thailand's A list actors and actresses gliding along the red carpet to celebrate their lustrous, beautiful selves - and of course their... More »
  

Review: BADLAPUR, Who Wins When Sweet Revenge Goes Sour?

Badlapur opens with a single take of a bank robbery gone wrong. In any other film, this sequence would be a garish mish-mash of flashing lights, loud yelling, and confusion, however, in this world the major faux pas turns out... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: HOT TUB TIME MACHINE 2 Is #2 In More Ways Than One

It would be wrong to call Hot Tub Time Machine 2 an ugly, smug, hateful waste of cinema, because to do so would imply that it indeed exhibits at least a flair for the cinematic. Which, of course, is not... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: KUNG FU ELLIOT, Canada's First Action Hero

Yes. You read that right. Canada's first action hero. China has Jackie Chan and Jet Li. America has Arnold and Sly. Europe has Jean-Claude Van Damme. And if Elliot Scott has his way, Canada will have... Elliot "White Lightning" Scott.... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: WILD TALES, A Comedic Thought Experiment

As it happens, last year I found myself in a relatively short line at the Cannes film festival for "some Argentinian film," as the person standing next to me put it when I asked what we were to see. I... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: ALL THE WILDERNESS Digs Deep Into the Emotional Psyche of a Young Man

Once I was a teenager. Granted, that's been many years ago. But it's amazing how quickly long-submerged feelings bubble to the surface when given the right poke in the psyche. The poker, in this case, is wielded by writer/director Michael... More »
By Peter Martin   
  
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