New York 2014 Review: THE PRINCESS OF FRANCE, Matias Pineiro's Beguiling Riff On Shakespeare

The Princess of France is Argentine director Matías Piñeiro's third entry in his series of Shakespeare-inspired films, which he calls his "Shakespearead." The first two of these were his 43-minute short Rosalinda (2011), inspired by "As You Like It," and... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: It's The Trip, Not The Destination, In INHERENT VICE

P. T. Anderson faithfully adapts Thomas Pynchon's most accessible novel, the zaniest surf noir, Inherent Vice. It is also the first time he's worked with a large ensemble cast since Magnolia. The result is often hilarious, a laborious snapshot of... More »
  

Review: DOCTOR WHO S8E07, Kill The Moon (Or, The Doctor Doesn't Decide)

Let's get straight to it. The idea that Doctor Who is weighing in with its thoughts on abortion and a woman's right to choose is surprising, to say the least. The episode uses the realisation that there's something going on... More »
  

Vancouver 2014 Review: THE GOLDEN ERA Hits All Of Its Marks

The Golden Era follows the (tragically short) life of one of China's most celebrated female writers, Xiao Hong (portrayed by Tang Wei), in typically lavish period-biopic fashion. On an aesthetic level, the film is gorgeously realized by director Ann Hui,... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: WILD FLOWERS Wilts After A Bristling Start

The lives of aimless youths at the bottom of the social ladder are the focus of Wild Flowers, a bleak look into teenage destitution in the streets and back alleys of Seoul. Uncompromising in its focus and brisk in its... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: MARGARITA, WITH A STRAW, A Top Shelf Crowd Pleaser

Premiering this year at the Toronto International Film Festival, Margarita, With A Straw received standing ovations at each of its three sold-out screenings, and it is not hard to understand why. Dismissing any cliché or heavy handed sentiments, director Shonali Bose... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: A MATTER OF INTERPRETATION Is David Lynch Meets Hong Sangsoo

Following his terrific debut Romance Joe (2011), Lee Kwang-kuk is back in Busan with A Matter of Interpretation, a breathless play on dream logic with smart plotting and a great script that proves he's no fluke, and then some. Frustrated... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: END OF WINTER Boasts Strong Cast And Subtle Mise-en-scene

Dankook University scores a New Currents competition slot at the Busan International Film Festival for the second year running with End of Winter, a controlled family drama taking place in the dead of winter. Eschewing histrionics in favour of a... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: HAN RIVER Ponders Urban Malaise in Contemporary Korea

With black and white lensing, cheerful yet destitute protagonists and the absence of a clear narrative, the philosophical vagabond film Han River, benefits from a style and focus that sets it apart from the bulk of recent Korean indie fare,... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: DAUGHTER Explores The Ills Of Modern Korean Parenting

Following a pair of indulgent films that awkwardly straddled the balance between fantasy and reality, the multi-hyphenate Ku Hye-sun, a well known actress, singer and artist as well as director, returns with Daughter, her most mature work to date. An... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: WE WILL BE OK Hits Its Stride Too Late In The Game

Writers are told to write about what they know, so it stands to reason that the same rule should apply to filmmakers. As a result, many films take place within the film world and in the Korean industry this proves... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: A MIDSUMMER'S FANTASIA Effortlessly Draws You Into Its Subtle Tale

Taking place in the quiet town of Gojo in Japan, an ageing community tinged with a lingering sadness and marked by stillness, A Midsummer's Fantasia is a wistful, hopeful and nostalgic third feature by rising Korean indie auteur Jang Kunjae.... More »
  

Review: FISHING WITHOUT NETS Expertly Expands the Somali Pirate Story

You'd be excused for a slight case of déjà vu when reading the description of Cutter Hodierne's feature debut Fishing Without Nets. Somali pirates have been a hot topic lately with both Danish film A Hijacking and Paul Greengrass's Tom... More »
  

TV Review: SCROTAL RECALL S1E1, ABIGAIL Delivers A Hysterical And Surprisingly Earnest Take On Modern Relationships

Dylan has a problem. Young and earnest, a believer in true love and all of those things, Dylan is the sort of young man that you'd love to bring home to mom. But if you did you'd also be bringing... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Busan 2014 Review: SECOND LIFE OF THIEVES Is Mundanely Melancholic

A melancholic malaise permeates the incredibly subdued and softly told Second Life of Thieves, the latest feature from Malaysian director Woo Ming Jin. Set in the sweltered confines of a seaside village, the film transgresses past and present confidently. Initially... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: EDEN, An Ambitious Yet Personal Look at 90s Electronic Dance Music Scene

The other day, I saw a college kid wearing a T- shirt that said, "In school now just to be a wage slave later." I seriously considered giving the kid a hug. And I could've easily regarded it as some... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: ENTANGLED Gets Caught Up In Its Own Depressing Narrative

Following the blistering debut Fatal, a gritty rape-revenge thriller that bowed at the Busan Film Festival in 2012, Lee Don-ku returns to Busan with the disappointing family drama Entangled. Though it seeks to inspire a similar sense of shock and... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: GIFTED Takes An Interesting Turn Before Veering Off Course

Taking its cue from the common social grievances often found in Korean indie dramas, Gifted, the sophomore effort of Poongsan (2011) helmer Jung Jai-hung, examines the friction between unemployment and consumerist ambitions in modern Korea. Slight and familiar, the film... More »
  

Review: LEFT BEHIND, Polite, First-Class Apocalyptic Disaster

So long, suckers! What's most remarkable about Left Behind isn't that Nicolas Cage is starring in a religious-themed movie about the end of the world, nor is it that longtime stunt coordinator extraordinaire Vic Armstrong is finally directing his sophomore... More »
  

Busan 2014 Review: PARADISE IN SERVICE, A Classical Tearjerker

Paradise in Service is presented by Taiwanese film-maker Hou Hsiao-Hsien but it is certainly not directed by him. This classical melodrama is a much more accessible film, and although conventional, communist-war period in Taiwan is brought to vivid life thanks... More »
  
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