Review: 22 JUMP STREET, Charmingly Aware That It's A Sequel

Sequels are often rough things. Save for franchises where the expectation of similarity is baked in, the second of a kind is rarely as successful as the first. Success, of course, need not mean in terms of dollars and cents,... More »
  

Review: WOLFCOP, The Hairy But Tangled Canadian Horror Comedy

So now that western Canada has had its fill of Lowell Dean's horror comedy Wolfcop (if you think you missed it do not worry for it has been carried over) those of us in eastern Canada find ourselves in the... More »
  

Review: I HATE LOVE Loves The Rom-Com Formula

Debuting internationally in 2012, but only now arriving in Mexican movie theaters, I Hate Love (Odio el Amor) tries too hard to be a distinctive effort in the romantic comedy field. It brings a mixed cast, with both Mexicans and Americans,... More »
  

Review: Emmanuelle Devos Shines in Biopic VIOLETTE

Ever since her breakout role as a deaf office worker, Carla, in Jacques Audiard's audacious caper flick Read My Lips, Emmanuelle Devos has risen to become one of the top French actresses of our time, working with auteur filmmakers such... More »
  

Review: THE SIGNAL Goes Everywhere, Mysteriously

A dreamy atmosphere is established early in William Eubank's sophomore feature The Signal, holding the promise that the story could go, literally, anywhere. It's a haunting, lonely, moody, deliberately-paced atmosphere that's reminiscent of Eubank's debut, Love, which was set aboard... More »
  

DVD Review: Urasawa Naoki's MONSTER, Episodes 61-74 (End...)

(Does it take two headshots to finish off someone with a split personality?) To say I've been eagerly awaiting the fifth boxset of the Monster anime is an understatement. The fourth set ended with enough cliffhangers to break off an... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Imagine 2014 Review: YOUNG DETECTIVE DEE: RISE OF THE SEA DRAGON 3D

(You WILL believe a man can fly, provided he jumps hard and adds enough corkscrews in mid-air...) One of the great things of film festivals is that they sometimes allow you a rare chance to experience foreign films as they... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Distrital 2014 Review: THE HAMSTERS Defines A Dysfunctional Family

The Hamsters (Los Hámsters) is the thesis film of CCC student Gilberto González Penilla. Right from the beginning, you understand what the director is trying to achieve with it, as he makes you look at an average Mexican family during... More »
  

Review: THE FAULT IN OUR STARS, When Tear-Jerking Is Not Enough

To paraphrase Shakespeare (badly): If you place cancer kids in front of me, will I not cry? What human being with an ounce of empathy would not be touched deeply at the sight of a terminally-ill person, especially a child... More »
  

Review: RIGOR MORTIS Pays Eerie Homage To Hong Kong Vampires

Hong Kong popstar-turned-actor Juno Mak continues to defy expectations with his directorial debut, a sombre and eerie eulogy to the hopping vampires of the 1980s that trades the sub-genre's signature laughs for world-weary melancholy from a fine cast of screen... More »
  

Review: BORGMAN Fiendishly Recounts The Time The Devil Went Up To Holland

The titular character of Alex van Warmerdam's Borgman does not have horns, nor does he command grotesque demons spawned from hellfire. Emaciated, clothed in rags with long hair and a beard, he actually looks a lot like Jesus at first.... More »
  

Review: THE SACRAMENT Is Delicious Kool-Aid For Thirsty Viewers

Sometimes we are frankly limited by our terminology. What do you call a film that uses in-world video? That is to say, what do you call a film where the camera used to exclusively record the footage is incorporated as... More »
  

Sydney 2014 Review: Taut Thriller TOM AT THE FARM Reinvents Director Xavier Dolan

As of this writing, wunderkind French-Canadian director Xavier Dolan at the age of 25 is premiering his fifth feature film, Mummy, on the Croisette. Making its Australian premiere at the Sydney Film Festival, however, is Dolan's fourth work, Tom at the Farm, which... More »
  

The Kids Talk Film: MAD MAX 2: THE ROAD WARRIOR

When the opportunity presented itself to see George Miller's car-pocalypse cult spectacular The Road Warrior on the big screen in Toronto a dodging of the R rating was necessary for Willem (age 11), but his younger sister Miranda (age 9) was... More »
  

Review: MALEFICENT Casts A Feminist Spell

Call her Beneficent. Rebooting the studio's 1959 animated film Sleeping Beauty into a live-action version suitable for the 21st century, Maleficent casts a strong feminist spell. "I don't think she's very happy," says one of the fairies in Walt Disney's... More »
  

Review: NIGHT MOVES, A Tense Showcase Of Guilt And Paranoia

When purchasing a used boat for an act of extreme vandalism, a young activist quips that she chose the one named "Night Moves" because it was better in her mind than "Sea Breeze" or "Heart's Ease." I tend to pay... More »
  

Udine 2014 Review: BILOCATION, A Surprisingly Intriguing But Messy Psycho-Thriller

Even though it has most of the ingredients of a typical J-horror, Bilocation spices up a slightly worn-out formula with material that would otherwise be reserved for other genres, and instead of relying on overused plot devices, controls the narrative with thought-provoking... More »
  

Cannes 2014 Review: THE SALT OF THE EARTH Celebrates Photographic Art

There are a few titans of narrative cinema - Martin Scorsese and Spike Lee come first to mind - who make documentaries that rival their feature film work. Another example is Werner Herzog, a filmmaker whose non-fiction films are still... More »
  

Review: A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST Strikes Comedy Gold

From the opening credits of director Seth MacFarlane's latest offensive and broad comedy, it is clear that he is wearing his Family Guy hat, although one can argue it is permanently affixed to his head.The ode to the woeful Wild... More »
  

Cannes 2014 Review: WHITE GOD Unleashes The Hounds Of Allegory

Doggedly heavy on allegory, the film by Hungarian director Kornél Mundruczó's White God (Fehér Isten) has a relatively simple premise - beware the comeuppance for those that treat badly those they believe to be inferior.At its heart, the film plays... More »
  
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