Slamdance 2015 Review: TIRED MOONLIGHT, An Effervescent, Enchanting Debut

Britni West's debut feature is sure to be the most enchanting feature at this year's Slamdance. An ode to small town America, every moment in West's film is is one of effervescent discovery, culling childhood wonder and adult wanderlust with... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: TANGERINE Pops With Verve And Vérité

On the streets of Los Angeles sunlight seems to move differently than in most places. It blazes, arching across the sky, like a banshee spreading its wings. From behind the wheel of your car, inching forward in the hellion-marked traffic... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE Is Flocking Marvelous

Aardman Studios return to the big screen in cracking form with another rip-roaring roller coaster of action, smart humour and lovable characters. Shaun The Sheep Movie promises to delight fans of all ages, and long-time aficionados of the studio's signature... More »
By James Marsh   
  

San Cristóbal De Las Casas 2015 Review: PORTRAITS OF A SEARCH, A Forceful Documentary On The Victims Of The Mexican Drug War

One of the toughest moments in Narco Cultura comes from a layer of the whole drug war problem that is not profoundly explored in that recent documentary: What are the feelings and thoughts of the familiars of the assassinated or... More »
  

Review: In SONG ONE, The Tune May Be Familiar, But The Performance Is Lovely

One of the great pleasures of experiencing music, especially genres such as pop, or - more pertinently for this review - indie folk, lies in the familiarity of its forms. Like comfort food for the ears, they follow well-established stylistic... More »
  

Review: LA ENTIDAD Is A Small Step Forward For Peruvian Horror

La Entidad marks the latest foray from a genre-untested director into horror movies. Eduardo Schuldt, previously known for working in children's animation (see the likes of The Dolphin: Story of a Dreamer or Freedom Force) proves himself surprisingly adept at... More »
  

Review: GANGNAM BLUES, A Gorgeously Overwrought Gangster Classic In The Making

Yoo Ha returns to gangster cinema and knocks it right out of the park with his latest, an evocative and immensely entertaining saga that pits a common tale of brotherhood and betrayal against a thrilling period setting mired in violence... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: WAVES, A Quietly Emotional Cross-Cultural Drama

In Don Gerardo Frasco's Waves, a seemingly idyllic island paradise in the Philippines unexpectedly turns into a battleground of mixed emotions for two friends-turned-secret-lovers desperately trying to revive a brief yet intense love affair that, at first sight, clearly falls... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Review: R100, An Intensely Intelligent And Witty Study Of Human Behavior

By the time Matsumoto Hitoshi made the move into feature films with his 2007 effort Big Man Japan, he was already a massive star in his native Japan, his television comedy work having firmly established Matsumoto as one of the... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Review: THE DUKE OF BURGUNDY, Universal Truths About Mating Rituals

Starting off with what is undoubtedly the opening credit sequence of the year, Peter Strickland's The Duke of Burgundy never ceases to surprise and delight over its 100 minutes, offering a dry but meticulous humour and rhythm. Those credits, offering... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: CAKE Serves Up Honest, Emotional Storytelling

"I hope you're ready to be depressed," whispered the person sitting next to me to no one in particular as the opening frames of Cake started to roll. Indeed, director Daniel Barnz's film about a woman confronting debilitating pain, drug... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

San Cristóbal De Las Casas 2015 Review: ALL OF ME, Focusing On The Human Side

All of Me (aka Llévate Mis Amores) is a documentary that deals with a well known subject - the illegal immigrants from Central America, recently portrayed in Diego Quemada-Diez's successful narrative film The Golden Dream - but that manages to... More »
  

Review: EX_MACHINA Starts Strong, But Falls Into Cliché

Alex Garland has become known for some pretty great sci-fi screenplays, such as 28 Days Later, Sunshine and Dredd. So it seems only natural that he would eventually direct one of his own works. Ex_Machina has some great elements, such as... More »
  

Review: THE ROYAL TAILOR Spins A Colorful Period Yarn

Period dramas are all the rage in Korea at the moment, but while some have been setting records at the box office (such as Roaring Currents), not all have been successful. No film is a guaranteed hit but period productions... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

San Cristóbal De Las Casas 2015 Review: In THE NAPTIME, Life Must Go On

It's not an easy task to make a documentary about such a controversial topic as the tragedy of the ABC daycare facility in northern Mexico, in which a fire caused the death of 49 children back in June 2009. With... More »
  

Review: CHRONICLE OF A BLOOD MERCHANT Favors Strong Cast Over Plot

Outside of indie cinema, actors directing themselves in leading roles are quite rare in Korean films, making Ha Jung-woo's Chronicle of a Blood Merchant something of an oddity. One of the country's biggest stars, Ha surrounds himself with a wealth... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: THE CON ARTISTS Aims Right Down the Middle And Is All The Better For It

There are many things we demand from films: good stories, strong characters, style... the list goes on. However, more than everything else, there is one thing people clamor for the most, particularly in its absence: originality. We readily point out clichés... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: PADDINGTON Bears Watching

Going into Paddington, I fully expected a film with the cinematic nutritional value of a marmalade sandwich. Saddled with the most cringe inducing trailer of last year, and the fact that its U.S. release got bumped into the dread month... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: Shankar's I: A Tale Full Of Sound And Fury, Signifying... Something?

I have a problem.I am a great admirer of Shankar, the director of I. Even when his films aren't great, as in the case of something like his take down of India's insidious corruption problem, Sivaji, they are engaging and... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: VICE, Sexism Is Only Its First Offense

By featuring two scenes of repulsive violence against women in its early going, Vice digs itself into a deep hole. Theoretically, it's possible that Vice, an ostensible action vehicle driven by Thomas Jane -- with Bruce Willis sitting quietly in... More »
By Peter Martin   
  
  Next »
Page 3 of 414