Review: STATION TO STATION, In A Realm Of Its Own

It consists of countless bands, playing on and off a polychromatic train as it passes through innumerable cities. But Station To Station is no rockumentary. That it often features brilliant bands playing live on a train will perhaps evoke, for some, the choo... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

Review: See A Moving Biosphere in J.P. Sniadecki's THE IRON MINISTRY

Just like Leviathan and Manakamana before it, J.P. Sniadecki's The Iron Ministry is another striking sensory cinema experience. Closely associated with Havard Sensory Ethnography Lab and its esteemed Colleagues - Julien Castraing-Taylor, Verena Paravel, Stephanie Spray, Pacho Velez and others, ... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: 6 YEARS Succeeds Wildly In Exploring A Precarious Relationship

Young love can be so damn difficult. This is the fertile soil tilled in Hannah Fidell's 6 Years, the follow-up to her critically acclaimed debut feature A Teacher. As in that film, Fidell employs a distinctly naturalistic filmmaking style to... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Book Review: Piers Bizony's THE MAKING OF STANLEY KUBRICK'S 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY

(My God, it's full of fold-outs...!) Last year, the German publishing house Taschen released an astonishing holy grail for fans of Stanley Kubrick's seminal science fiction film 2001: A Space Odyssey: a boxset which included four book volumes, enclosed in... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: JOURNEY TO ROME, Imaginary Embroidery Reigns Over Spiritual Comedy

One of the most common mistakes of filmmaking neophytes is an adamant effort to ram a wagon of ideas into their first outing even at the cost of crippling the final result. The credo, 'I am doing a big film... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Review: BROTHERS, A Brawler Submits To Bollywood Bloat

Gavin O'Connor's Warrior was a surprise critical and box office hit back in 2011, as well as being one of the first studio films set within the increasingly popular world of Mixed Martial Arts fighting. That film pitted brothers Tom... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: CHARLIE'S COUNTRY Enthralls

When I saw Rolf de Heer's Bad Boy Bubby in an arthouse theatre back in the mid-90s, I was totally unprepared for such raw and nihilistic filmmaking. A violent and dark film, it was clear from that one film that... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: THE GREEDY TIFFANY, A Feat In Czech Genre Production

Genre production does not really thrive in Czech Republic. The contrary seems to be the case, and it appears to be rather an endangered species. This year saw the release of two horror films of the same breed (found footage). While... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Locarno 2015 Review: RIGHT NOW, WRONG THEN, Stars Shine In Classic Hong Sangsoo

Following Hong Sangsoo's career guarantees for viewers, at the very least, one thing - developing a keen eye for detail. The auteur's films are remarkably similar to one another, from their lecherous male director/professor characters and conversations over bottles of... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: PRINCE, Innocence Triumphs Over Thug Life

Young Dutch filmmaker Sam de Jong's debut film Prince has all the stereotypical elements that make up a so-called gangsta movie: guns, drugs, babes, bling-blings and expensive sports mobiles. But underneath all its macho posturing, inner-city working class clichés and... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: BIG SKY, A Modest, Quiet Survival Drama

Like many sophomore features, Jorge Michel Grau's Big Sky suffers a bit by comparison with what came before. That's especially so because Grau debuted with the immensely impressive Somos lo que hay (We Are What We Are), an atmospheric character... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: MISTRESS AMERICA, Easy, Breezy Comedy With A Point

After falling into a depressing, dour pit with 2010's Greenberg, director Noah Baumbach rebounded with the far more lighthearted and sprightly Frances Ha, which he co-wrote with Greta Gerwig. Their collaboration continued on a successful note with last year's While... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: ONE & TWO, Emotionally Rich And Surprisingly Mystical

Isolation can be a killer. For the children who are the heart and soul of One and Two, that's especially so, given that they have been raised in isolation, surrounded by a giant wall. Eva (Kiernan Shipka, Mad Men) and... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: PEOPLE, PLACES, THINGS, A Lovely, Comforting Film

People, Places, Things is a dry, almost forgettable title that refers to a film much better than those adjectives strung together by commas. It's a quotidian moniker for a film that's kind of exceptional, celebrated not only because of its... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: THE GLASS MAN, A Frightening Spiral Into A Personal Hell

The most uncomfortable subject is not sex; it is money. Not in political discussions, but personal ones. We don't ask people how much money they make; we don't ask them about their personal finances. It is probably safe to assume... More »
  

Lima 2015 Review: THE FIRE (EN INCENDIO) Consumes A Relationship And Makes You Watch

Brutal and horrifying are words you'd normally use to describe a horror movie, not a relationship drama, but The Fire (El Incendio), from first-time director Juan Schnitman, earns them. It has nothing to do with ghosts or monsters, but it's... More »
  

Review: AMNESIAC, Michael Polish's Refreshing Take On A Hostage Thriller

Twin filmmakers Michael and Mark Polish occupy a special spot in the American indie landscape. Since their strong debut Twin Falls Idaho, a weird little movie about conjoined twins, the brothers have been chugging along surviving in Hollywood, acting and... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: WE COME AS FRIENDS, Shadows Of Colonial Past Still Loom Over South Sudan

Hubert Sauper, a Paris based filmmaker known for his searing eco-disaster exposé in Tanzania, Darwin's Nightmare (2005), continues to document the African continent in his new documentary, We Come As Friends. This time, he sheds light on the post-referendum era... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Lima 2015 Review: DOS BESOS, A Melodrama With Some Surprises

Peruvian director Francisco J. Lombardi has worked steadily since the late 70s, having made 18 films; not a small feat in a country where making movies is a difficult task. The Lima Film Festival is one of the longest running... More »
  

Review: THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. Targets Style Over Spying

For its big screen reboot of the classic 60s spy series, Warner Brothers is hoping Guy Ritchie can replicate the success of their earlier Sherlock Holmes adaptations, again favouring witty banter and period detail over the material's more action-oriented elements.... More »
By James Marsh   
  
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